Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for New Zealand (New Zealand) or search for New Zealand (New Zealand) in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ther, Robert Plumer Ward, who died in 1846, was the author of three novels,—Tremaine, De Vere, and De Clifford; and of works on international law and other subjects. son of Tremaine Ward, and M. P., whose motion on Irish affairs nearly upset the ministry; Charles Austin (the first lawyer in England, mejudice); Gibbon Wakefield; Edward Gibbon Wakefield, 1796-1862. He was an author of books on colonial questions, and private secretary of the Earl of Durham in Canada in 1839. He died in New Zealand, with whose interests he had become identified. Stanley, M. P. (not Lord); and Miss Martineau, who seemed surprised to meet me there. His Lordship is remarkable in personal appearance,— slender, upright, with an open countenance, coal-black hair and eyes. He is very frank in the expression of his opinions, and uses good language, without being fluent. There is also a slight tremulousness in his voice, which is not a little strange in one so long accustomed to public affairs. In langua
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
ther, Robert Plumer Ward, who died in 1846, was the author of three novels,—Tremaine, De Vere, and De Clifford; and of works on international law and other subjects. son of Tremaine Ward, and M. P., whose motion on Irish affairs nearly upset the ministry; Charles Austin (the first lawyer in England, mejudice); Gibbon Wakefield; Edward Gibbon Wakefield, 1796-1862. He was an author of books on colonial questions, and private secretary of the Earl of Durham in Canada in 1839. He died in New Zealand, with whose interests he had become identified. Stanley, M. P. (not Lord); and Miss Martineau, who seemed surprised to meet me there. His Lordship is remarkable in personal appearance,— slender, upright, with an open countenance, coal-black hair and eyes. He is very frank in the expression of his opinions, and uses good language, without being fluent. There is also a slight tremulousness in his voice, which is not a little strange in one so long accustomed to public affairs. In langua
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 27: services for education.—prison discipline.—Correspondence.— January to July, 1845.—age, 34. (search)
or Latin he had not determined. You know he studied diligently the old Tartar dialect, that he might salute the Emperor in his court language. Fletcher Webster is preparing a book on China. What is thought of Cousin and his philosophy? Is the first volume of his edition of Plato published? How is Guizot's name pronounced? Is the Gui as in Guido in Italian, or as in guillotine in French? I detest the war spirit in Thiers's book. It is but little in advance of the cannibalism of New Zealand. What do you think of phrenology, and of animal magnet. ism? Eothen is a vivid, picturesque book, by a man of genius. What are you doing? When do you set your face Westward? I suppose Wheaton will be recalled; and I was told yesterday that Irving would be also, in all probability. . . . Ever thine, Chas. To Thomas Crawford. Boston, May 10, 1845. my dear Crawford,—I suppose you have not yet received the letter from the students. I believe they postponed it till you are kn