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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,404 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 200 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 188 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 184 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 166 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 164 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 132 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 100 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 100 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) or search for Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ction eight men were killed and wounded within a few minutes, leaving but three at the gun. Among the killed was Corporal Sanchez, a Spaniard, long resident in Mexico, where he had commanded a company under Santa Anna during our war with that country. He was a man of fine military education, and an accomplished linguist. Wheight flank company. Thus composed, the regiment under its distinguished Colonel became the crack corps of the State. Upon the breaking out of hostilities with Mexico, in the spring of 1846, the Washington Artillery, under a requisition from General Zachary Taylor, volunteered with their battery—which had been increased by purch was the spirit of the Washington Artillery more than forty years ago, and, I am proud to say, such it has ever been and such it is to-day. After the war with Mexico the military enthusiasm very much weakened; organization after organization was disbanded, leaving the Washington Artillery almost alone, struggling and apathetic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
w became exposed to a raking fire from the left. The first section, under Lieutenant Ritter was on the left, and was consequently the most severely handled. Under a fire of almost unprecedented intensity, his two guns were speedily silenced, and not long after the other two, under Lieutenant Glies. At the right gun of Ritter's section eight men were killed and wounded within a few minutes, leaving but three at the gun. Among the killed was Corporal Sanchez, a Spaniard, long resident in Mexico, where he had commanded a company under Santa Anna during our war with that country. He was a man of fine military education, and an accomplished linguist. When number four at the gun was shot down, Sanchez was ordered to fire the piece, but was at that moment struck by the fragment of a shell and thrown by it to the distance of ten feet. He asked to be removed from the spot where he fell. Sergeant Frazier, Lieutenant Ritter and Private Ben. Garst carried him to the right of the gun, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
ion. The Washington Artillery, then just reorganized (February 22, 1840), was the right flank company. Thus composed, the regiment under its distinguished Colonel became the crack corps of the State. Upon the breaking out of hostilities with Mexico, in the spring of 1846, the Washington Artillery, under a requisition from General Zachary Taylor, volunteered with their battery—which had been increased by purchase to six six-pounder bronze guns—and proceeded to Corpus Christi, Texas, where Ta of efficiency and readiness for service at the individual cost of the members. Such was the spirit of the Washington Artillery more than forty years ago, and, I am proud to say, such it has ever been and such it is to-day. After the war with Mexico the military enthusiasm very much weakened; organization after organization was disbanded, leaving the Washington Artillery almost alone, struggling and apathetic. In 1852 it was found necessary again to rally for another reorganization. In Ju
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
lready established his own martial fame at Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Cherubusco, Molino del Rey, Chepultepec and Mexico, and had proved how little he depended upon any merit but his own. Such was his early distinction., that when but a Captaly tribute, for Johnston himself had fallen, terribly wounded. The hero, covered with ten wounds received in Florida and Mexico, had been prostrated by another; and when June 1st dawned on the confronting armies, the Army of Northern Virginia was wities devolved upon him required assiduous study and research. Still later, after he returned with great distinction from Mexico, he became the Superintendent and Head of the Military Academy at West Point, and occupying that position for three yearsnatural beauty, and keen sympathy, for all living things show the exquisite sensibilities of his heart. His letters from Mexico teem with expressions of the delight with which he looked upon the bright-winged birds and luxuriant flowers of that sunn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
written by Captain R. E. Lee to his brother, Sidney Smith Lee, of the navy. It is dated City of Mexico, 4th of March, 1848. It was not only written without any expectation of its ever being publishen his expressions of admiration and friendship for Lee. His dispatches and official reports from Mexico were filled with the warmest commendations of his favorite engineer officer. Of his services du fire of the enemy. In his official report of the final operations which captured the city of Mexico, General Scott declares Captain Lee to have been as distinguished for felicitous execution as fond the loss of two nights' sleep at the batteries. When, soon after General Scott's return from Mexico, a committee from Richmond waited on him to tender him a public reception in the Capitol of his e had been intimate with General Scott, and had heard him say more than once that his success in Mexico was largely due to the skill, valor and undaunted energy of Lee. It was a theme upon which he (G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
horities in Texas for some time and until his escape by flight into and through Mexico. He took up his residence in Ohio, was elected Lieutenant Governor, and becamege. He then proceeded to say that in the march from Vera Cruz to the city of Mexico there was not an encampment nor a battle-field which had not been previously sethe army in the year 18—. He was with General Scott on the march to the city of Mexico, and took much pleasure in his declining years in relating the incidents of that campaign. He told me that a day or two after the occupation of the city of Mexico the officers of the United States army gave to General Scott a grand banquet. offered by General Scott to the then Captain Lee, at the banquet in the city of Mexico, of which I believe you have given an exactly correct statement. Joshua F. Bul office of engineer, whose faded laurels he had gathered and worn in and out of Mexico a score of years before? I find no such record nor the least probability of th