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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,404 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 200 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 188 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 184 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 166 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 164 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 132 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 100 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 100 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 4, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) or search for Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 3 document sections:

uction of his policy — Napoleonic ideas — into Mexico! They will be indignant at the event, and mayt, nay, pleased, with the change of affairs in Mexico — with the prospect of order and security in tvernment, and security to person and property, Mexico will become a great producing country — her pr ocean. Humboldt says that in the ascent from Mexico the climates succeed each other in layers, and with so diversified a temperature and soil as Mexico will produce everything known to the agricultuests, are very valuable. Of these productions Mexico has exported considerably; but owing to the di the globe. The chief source of wealth of Mexico to this time has been its mines. The silver m three hundred thousand pounds per annum. Mexico has done something in the way of manufacturingcombined brought about the events which placed Mexico in the hands of an European power, and thus loUnion, it is all the better for the South that Mexico is placed beyond their grasp, and is under the[4 more.
ankee view of the proclamation of an Empire in Mexico — What will be Thought of it in Europe. Thial on the recent proclamation of an Empire in Mexico, in which is labors to prove the whole thing The promulgation of the second empire in Mexico is important, in the first place, much as itdistinctly defines the policy of the French in Mexico, about which there has been so much heavy and poleon joined the tripartite coalition against Mexico. The promulgation of the Mexican Empire Europe. When the tripartite coalition against Mexico was signed in London, October, 1861, it is sapoleon, in proposing to establish an empire in Mexico, with the Austrian Maximilian as Emperor, desied, retrogressive, monarchical priest party of Mexico, and of course it is a great victory to the ulers of Mexican bonds in sustaining Napoleon in Mexico, is manifested from the course of the London Tof the power of their arch enemy, Napoleon, in Mexico. The French Emperor has long stood preemi
Mexico and the Yankees The Petersburg Express suggests that the Yankees will be placed in a quandary with reference to the question of recognizing the new empire of Mexico. The Federal Minister, Corwin, is in the city of Mexico, a spectator ofMexico. The Federal Minister, Corwin, is in the city of Mexico, a spectator of the scene of revolution so painful to his Government, but has not dared to say a word against it. Nor will he. Yet the matter of recognizing the new Government, and opening relations with it, cannot be gotten rid of What Jonathan will do is a matterMexico, a spectator of the scene of revolution so painful to his Government, but has not dared to say a word against it. Nor will he. Yet the matter of recognizing the new Government, and opening relations with it, cannot be gotten rid of What Jonathan will do is a matter of curiosity. There is another question of some interest, and it is this: The renowned Corwin, who went to Mexico just after the present war begun, bamboozled the Mexicans into a treaty giving to Abraham Lincoln the privilege to send his troopsMexico just after the present war begun, bamboozled the Mexicans into a treaty giving to Abraham Lincoln the privilege to send his troops across their territory to attack our Southern border. Will the new Government be expected to respect that treaty! If there is any such expectation, we have not a doubt that it will be disappointed. But speculation about what Yankee will do in