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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
d towns on the seaboard counties. The volunteer, organized militia, in the great central county of Worcester, and the four western counties of Hampden, Hampshire, Franklin, and Berkshire, did not exceed one thousand men; and in the counties of Barnstable, Nantucket, and Dukes, there was not a solitary company or a military organization of any description. At the commencement of the war, no one, however wise, was farseeing enough to foretell with any degree of accuracy its probable duration, furnish their full share of men for the military service, and this they did under every call of the President without complaint or murmur. In this connection we would call especial attention to the proceedings of the town-meetings held in Barnstable County and in other places whose interests were almost wholly maritime. In no portion of the Commonwealth or of the loyal States was there less fault-finding, or a more ready and determined purpose evinced to sustain the Government and the Union
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
Chapter 2: Barnstable County. The county of Barnstable includes the whole of Cape Cod which, extending east and north into the Atlanticcounty of Barnstable includes the whole of Cape Cod which, extending east and north into the Atlantic Ocean, was discovered by Gosnold in 1602. It is bounded north-west by Plymouth County, and west by Buzzard's Bay. Cape Cod lies in the form most every family is more or less identified and interested. Barnstable County is noted for its good sailors and men of superior nautical tat unobtrusive hospitality. There are but thirteen towns in Barnstable County, one of the largest and most important of which, at the presese in five years of $1,654,907.00. The number of men which Barnstable County furnished for the war was reported by the selectmen of the toommonwealth being about 91 to every 100 inhabitants; and that Barnstable County was not behind any other portion of the State is conclusivelyar, in regard to Falmouth, will apply to almost every town in Barnstable County:— At the time of the breaking out of the Rebellion, most
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 5: Dukes County. (search)
Chapter 5: Dukes County. This county is formed of the Islands of Martha's Vineyard. These islands lie off and south of Barnstable County and Buzzard's Bay, and contain about one hundred and twenty square miles. They constitute five townships, as follows: Edgartown, Chilmark, Gay Head, Gosnold, and Tisbury. The town of Gay Head was incorporated in 1870, from a part of Chilmark; and therefore its war record is included in that of the mother-town. The shire town of the county is Edgartown. The population of Dukes County in 1860 was 4,403; in 1865, 4,200, being a decrease in five years of 203. The population in 1870 was 3,787, which is a further decrease in five years of 413. The valuation of the county in 1860 was $2,908,194; in 1865, $2,183,976, which is a decrease in five years of $724,218. By the returns made by the selectmen of the several towns in 1866, the number of men furnished in the entire county for the war was 240, which is only about half of the real number w
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 11: Nantucket County. (search)
Chapter 11: Nantucket County. This county is an island which lies east from Duke's County, and about thirty miles south of Cape Cod or Barnstable County. It is fifteen miles in length from east to west, and about four miles average breadth: it contains fifty square miles. In 1659 it was bought by Thomas Macy of Thomas Mayhew for thirty pounds, in merchant pay and two beaver hats. It was first settled by whites in that year, when it contained about three thousand Indians; it was formerly well-wooded; the soil is light and sandy. The whale fishery commenced here in 1690, and has continued to the present time; it has a good harbor, on the borders of which the town of Nantucket is located. The history of Nantucket is very interesting, and its war record during the Rebellion, which is all we have now to do with, is highly honorable, and in brief is as follows:— Nantucket Incorporated as the town of Sherburn, June 27, 1687; name changed to Nantucket, June 8, 1795. Populat
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
Chapter 13: Plymouth County. This ancient and historic county is bounded north-east and east by Massachusetts Bay, north by Norfolk county and Boston harbor, north-west by Norfolk county, west by Bristol county, and south-east and south by Buzzard's Bay and Barnstable county. The North River, emptying into Massachusetts Bay, and numerous branches of the Taunton are its chief rivers. The shire town of the county, at which the courts are held, is Plymouth. The county has a sea coast on Massachusetts Bay of between thirty and forty miles. The land is not so fertile as in some of the other counties in the Commonwealth, yet there is considerable good land within its limits. The population of Plymouth county in 1860 was 64,758; in 1865, it was 63,074, being a decrease in five years of 1,684. The valuation in 1860 was $29,160,937; in 1865 it was $27,932,058, being a decrease in five years of $1,228,879. The county is divided into twenty-five townships, which, according to the re