Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Fauquier (Virginia, United States) or search for Fauquier (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 10: (search)
that point. So we continued our march wholly without interruption all the beautiful autumn day through the smiling county of Loudoun, one of the fairest and most fertile regions in Virginia, passing many fine estates with extensive corn-fields and large orchards, until we arrived in the evening in the vicinity of the little village of Upperville, where we bivouacked, and without difficulty obtained abundant provisions for our men and forage for our animals. The counties of Loudoun and Fauquier had known but little as yet of the devastations of the war, and abounded in supplies of every description, which were eagerly offered for sale by the farmers at moderate prices, and might have subsisted our army for six months. Instead of being permitted to profit by this plenty, we had been compelled for the past two months, through the mismanagement and want of experience of the officials of the Quartermaster's Department at Richmond, and against the earnest remonstrances of General Lee,
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 24: (search)
Chapter 24: Commencement of the summer campaign. forward movement of the army of Virginia. cavalry fights in Loudon and Fauquier counties. the cavalry fight near Middleburg, 19th of June. I am severely wounded. stay at Upperville, and retreat from there to Mr B.‘s plantation. the last eighteen months of my stay in the Confederacy. departure for Richmond, and sojourn at the capital and in the vicinity. winter 1863-64. Stuart's death. departure for England. General Lee hes at the little town of Orleans, where General Stuart and his Staff made a point of visiting our old friend Mrs M., by whom we were received with her usual kindness and hospitality. Our march thence lay through the rich and beautiful county of Fauquier, which as yet showed but little signs of suffering from the war, and at dark we reached the Piedmont Station of the Baltimore-Ohio Railway, where we bivouacked. Next morning as soon as it was light the famous guerilla chief Major Mosby, who had