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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 38 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 18 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Hannover (Lower Saxony, Germany) or search for Hannover (Lower Saxony, Germany) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
but very kind. She said her husband had told her I was coming, and that she had expected me both the preceding evenings; asked me about Boston, the United States, etc., etc.; said she did not like liberals in Europe, but that it was another thing in America, where the government was democratic, and it was a man's duty to be liberal; and so on, and so on. Other persons came in, and I was presented to the Minister at War, Count Hardegg; the Minister of Police; Bodenhausen, the Minister from Hanover; Steuber, the Minister from Hesse Cassel; and some others whose names I did not catch. I found there, too, Count Bombelles, whom I had known in 1818, as Austrian Charge d'affaires at Lisbon, See Vol. I. pp. 246, 247. and who is now a great man in a very agreeable office here, that of governor of the young archdukes, who are the heirs presumptive, as the Emperor has no children; a sinecure office thus far, since the eldest is not seven years old. He has married an English wife, talks
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
re are, I think, quite as good as those I made at Brussels . . . . Dr. Pertz was a student in Gottingen when we were studying there, and knew all about us through Rufstein, who wrote to you lately, and who is now one of the first men in the Kingdom of Hanover, being the head of its ecclesiastical establishment, and every way a most respectable person. Dr. Pertz was made librarian of the King's library, Hanover, (which is his native place,) after the death of our old friend Feder. . . . . . EnglHanover, (which is his native place,) after the death of our old friend Feder. . . . . . English is as much the language of his family as German, and being, besides, a true, sympathizing, faithful German of the old sort, there is nothing he has not been willing to do for me, out of regard for America Dr. Pertz's first wife was from Virginia, his second wife a sister of Lady Lyell. and the Lyells, and nothing in reason that he will not do for our Library hereafter, or cause to be done by his assistants, two or three of whom have been at my disposition for the last week.. . . . I b
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
somewhat famous, and was joined by Sir Charles Wood, and one or two people near us, who enjoyed the joke to the full. Mr. Crampton had been recently recalled from Washington, where he was British Minister, on complaints of our government. Mr. Ticknor says elsewhere: Thackeray, who has a strong personal regard for him, was outrageous on the matter, and cursed the Ministry by all his gods for making him, as he said, their scape-goat. As Mr. Ticknor expected, he was soon sent Minister to Hanover, and afterwards to St. Petersburg and Madrid. I found Mr. Crampton very agreeable, and immediately noticed his great resemblance to his father, as I knew Sir Philip in 1835. Yes, said a person to whom I mentioned it, they still look so much alike that we call them the twins. . . . . The Ministry were, no doubt, partly responsible for the mistakes about the enlistment last summer,—more, perhaps, than they can well admit. They were too much engrossed by the Russian war, and the worrying arra
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
oung Duke of Manchester and his very pretty wife, . . . . and I suppose a dozen more. . . . . Lady Granville introduced me to the Queen, the Duchess of Cambridge, and the Duke of Manchester. . . . . The Queen, with whom I had only a few words of ceremony, talks English very well, and is quite free and natural in her manners. The Duchess of Cambridge, who is very stout and plain, seemed to be full of German bonhomie, and I talked with her a long while about Hesse Cassel, where she was born, Hanover, which she knows well, etc. For half an hour I talked with the Duke and Duchess of Manchester, who invited me to visit them at Kimbolton. But the most agreeable person there, I suppose, was Lady Clanricarde, who amused me very much. . . . . I told Lord Palmerston that I had been dining where I met Lesseps, and that he was full of his canal. He may be full of his canal, said the Premier, but his canal will never be full of water, as the world will see. And then, having laughed heartily
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Appendix A. (search)
tate, that, however corrupt may be the character of Lord Byron, and however much you ought to despise both, yet he is entitled, as a stranger, to your thanks and gratitude for his kindness and attention to you while in London, and for the facilities with which he furnished you for Greece. Yet I hope, should you hereafter meet him anywhere on the Continent, that you will seek no further acquaintance with him. It will be of no credit to you in this country. March 22.—Since I returned from Hanover, my dearest and best of sons, I have not been very deficient or neglectful, as the multiplicity of my letters show the fact. To sit down quietly by myself, and write to my son, is one of the greatest pleasures I enjoy; except when I learn he is well, prosperous, and studious, judicious and happy, and relying on God, with an honest, thankful heart for all the benefits he enjoys, and for all the improvements he has made. When I hear you are well, and healthy, and contented, and pleased, you
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
2, 163, 164; Lady, 163, 164. Hampden, Dr., Bishop of Hereford, II. 375. Hampden, Miss, II. 380. Hampton Court, II. 382, 383. Hand, Professor, I. 115. Hanover, N. H., I. 3 note, 4, 5, 6, 384, 385 and note; Elisha Ticknor dies there, 2, 335. Hanover, visits, I. 77. Harcourt, Colonel, II. 323, 376, 377, 378. HarcHanover, visits, I. 77. Harcourt, Colonel, II. 323, 376, 377, 378. Harcourt, Lady, Catherine, II. 376, 377, 378. Harcourt, Lady, Susan, II. 391. Harcourt, Rev., William Vernon, I. 424, 435, 436, 437, II. 390, 391. 392; Mrs., I. 437, II. 390, 391, 392. Harcourt, (Sir) William Vernon, II. 873. Hardegg, Count, II. 6. Hardenberg, Prince, I. 485. Hare, Francis, II. 76 and note, 79, 80, 82; 488, 489, II. 204 note, 436; letters to, 191 and note, 196, 197, 198, 207, 210, 211; death of, 212, 213 and note. Leghorn, visits, I. 183. Leibnitz Mss. in Hanover, I. 78. Leipzig, visits, I. 107, II. 313, 316, 330. Lenox, Robert, I. 15. Lenzoni, Marchesa, II. 48, 56, 57, 88, 91, 92. Lepsius, Dr., K. R., II. 58, 84