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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
tillery, was stationed immediately in front of Fort Harrison. The battalion had formerly been commanded by Major William Allen, of Claremont, but at that time by Major J. O. Hensley, of Bedford county. It was composed of five companies—Companies A and C, from Richmond, commanded respectively by Captains J. W. Barlow and Thomas P. Wilkinson; Company B, from Bedford county, Captain Robert B. Clayton; Company D, from Prince George, Captain C. Shirley Harrison, of Brandon; and Company E, from Henrico, Captain Thomas Ballard Blake. Lieutenant Sam Wilson, was Adjutant. The 10th Virginia and the 19th Virginia Battalion (also composed of five companies) were under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel John Wilder Atkinson, of Richmond, with Lieutenant John L. Cowardin as adjutant. The 18th and 20th Virginia Battalions, commanded by Lieutenant- Colonel James Howard, of Baltimore, and the 18th Georgia Battalion, also attached to our command, formed what was known as the Artillery Brigade, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
Hill, the enemy would have been taken in flank and forced to give battle on ground more advantageous to us, or to make his retreat over the single road across Turkey Island creek. The depositions of three intelligent citizens and soldiers of Henrico county, sworn to before R. H. Nelson, a magistrate, then and afterwards a member of my cavalry company, and now living on Frazier's Farm, in Henrico county, can be seen in the records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series 1, Vol. XI, pagHenrico county, can be seen in the records of the Union and Confederate Armies, series 1, Vol. XI, page 677, and they prove beyond question that the road on which General Magruder was conducted by these guides was the only Quaker road known to those people; and now, after thirty-four years have elapsed, you may go there and the same road will be pointed out as the Quaker road. Defence of Magruder. There has been a charge more serious than that of mistaking roads, laid to the door of this gallant and unfortunate commander; and I want to disprove that to-night, and vindicate his memory. Not