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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 37 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Ulster County (New York, United States) or search for Ulster County (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 17 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bigelow, John, 1817- (search)
Bigelow, John, 1817- Author; born in Malden, John Bigelow. Ulster co., N. Y., Nov. 25, 1817; was graduated at Union College in 1835; and became a lawyer. In 1849-61 he was one of the editors of the New York Evening post. He was United States consul at Paris in 1861-64; minister to France in 1864-67, and secretary of state of New York in 1875-77. He was the biographer and trustee of the late Samuel J. Tilden: and in 1900 was president of the board of trustees of the New York public Library (q. v.). He is author of Molinos the Quictist; France and the Confederate Nary; Life of William Cullen Bryant; Life of Samuel J. Tilden; Some recollections of Edouard Laboulaye; The mystery of sleep, and editor of A life of Franklin; Writings and speeches of Samuel J. Tilden, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, Charles 1690-1773 (search)
vessel, with a view to their destruction by starvation, so as to obtain their property, landed them on barren Cape Cod, after receiving large sums of money as commutation for their lives. Clinton and his family and friends made their way to Ulster county, about 60 miles up the Hudson and 8 miles from it, in 1731, and there formed a settlement, he pursuing the occupation of farmer and surveyor. He was justice of the peace, county judge, and lieutenant-colonel of Ulster county, to which he gavUlster county, about 60 miles up the Hudson and 8 miles from it, in 1731, and there formed a settlement, he pursuing the occupation of farmer and surveyor. He was justice of the peace, county judge, and lieutenant-colonel of Ulster county, to which he gave its name. Two of his four sons were generals in the war for independence, and his youngest (George) was governor of the State of New York and Vice-President of the United States. He died in Ulster (now Orange) county, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1773.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, George 1739- (search)
pponent was Daniel Horsmanden, at one time chief-justice of the colony. After violent quarrels with all the political factions in New York, he abandoned the government in disgust, and returned home in 1753. He became governor of Greenwich Hospital — a sinecure. In 1745 he was vice-admiral of the red, and in 1757 admiral of the fleet. He died while governor of Newfoundland, July 10, 1761. Vice-President of the United States from 1805 to 1812; Republican; born in Little Britain, Ulster co., N. Y., July 26, 1739; was carefully educated by his father and a Scotch clergyman, a graduate of the University of Aberdeen. In early youth George made a successful cruise in a privateer in the French and Indian War, and soon afterwards joined a militia company, as lieutenant, under his brother James, in the expedition against Fort Frontenac in 1758. He chose the profession of law, studied it with William Smith, and became distinguished in it in his native county. In 1768 he was elected
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, James 1736-1812 (search)
Clinton, James 1736-1812 Military officer; born in Ulster (now Orange) county, N. Y., Aug. 9, 1736; son of Charles Clinton; was well educated, but he had a strong inclination for military life. Before the beginning of the Revolutionary War he was lieutenant-colonel of the militia of Ulster county. He was a captain under BUlster county. He was a captain under Bradstreet in the capture of Fort Frontenac in 1758; and he afterwards was placed in command of four regiments for the protection of the frontiers of Ulster and Orange counties — a position of difficulty and danger. When the war for independence broke out, he was appointed colonel of the 3d New York Regiment (June 30, 1775), and acUlster and Orange counties — a position of difficulty and danger. When the war for independence broke out, he was appointed colonel of the 3d New York Regiment (June 30, 1775), and accompanied Montgomery to Quebec. Made a brigadier-general in August, 1776, he was active in the service; and was in command of Fort Clinton, in the Hudson Highlands, when it was attacked in October, 1777. James Clinton. In 1779 he joined Sullivan's expedition against the Senecas with 1,500 men. He was stationed at Albany during
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Witt, Simeon, 1756-1834 (search)
De Witt, Simeon, 1756-1834 Surveyor; born in Ulster county, N. Y., Dec. 26, 1756; graduated at Queen's (now Rutgers) College in 1776; joined the army under Gates; and was made assistant geographer to the army in 1778, and chief geographer in 1780. He was surveyorgeneral of New York fifty years (1784-1834). In 1796 he declined the appointment of surveyor-general of the United States. He was regent, vice-chancellor, and chancellor of the State of New York, member of many learned societies, and author of Elements of Perspective (1835). He died in Ithaca, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1834.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), French refugees in America. (search)
French refugees in America. The colony of Huguenots planted in America by Coligni disappeared, but the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (q. v.) in 1685 caused another and larger emigration to America. The refugees in England had been kindly assisted there, and after the accession of William and Mary Parliament voted $75,000 to be distributed among persons of quality and all such as, through age or infirmity, were unable to support themselves. The King sent a large body of them to Virginia, and lands were allotted them on the James River; others purchased lands of the proprietaries of Carolina, and settled on the Santee River; while others—merchants and artisans—settled in Charleston. These Huguenots were a valuable acquisition to the colonies. In the South they planted vineyards and made wine. A large number of them settled in the province of New York, chiefly in Westchester and Ulster counties, and in the city of New Y
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gould, Jay 1836-1892 (search)
Gould, Jay 1836-1892 Capitalist; born in Roxbury, N. Y., May 27, 1836; studied in Hobart Academy and afterwards was employed as book-keeper in a blacksmith shop. Later he learned surveying and was given employment in making surveys for a map of Ulster county. After completing the survey of several other counties, he became interested in the lumbering business with Zadock Pratt, whose share he later purchased. Just before the panic of 1857 he sold his lumber business and went to Stroudsburg, Pa., where he entered a bank. It was at this time that he first became interested in railroad enterprises. Removing to New York City he became a broker, dealing at first in Erie Railroad bonds. In 1868 he was elected president of that company and remained in that office till 1872, when the company was reorganized, and he was forced as a result of long litigation to restore $7,550,000, a portion of the amount which it was alleged he had wrongfully acquired. While president of the Erie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kingston, (search)
Kingston, The present county seat of Ulster county, N. Y., was settled by the Dutch and Huguenots. It is memorable in the United States as the place where the first constitution of New York was framed, in 1777, and the first legislature was convened under it; also as having been destroyed by a British marauding expedition up the Hudson in the autumn of the same year.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, colony of (search)
of the French to assert jurisdiction south of lat. 45° N., until a long time afterwards. These emigrants were soon scattered to different points to form settlements— some to Long Island, some to the Connecticut River, others to the present Ulster county, and others founded Albany, where the company had built Fort Orange. Four young couples, married on shipboard, went to the Delaware, and began a settlement on the east side of the river (now Gloucester), 4 miles below Philadelphia, where theyion. The French then attacked the English. A party of Canadians and Indians burned Schenectady in 1690, and murdered nearly all of the inhabitants. In 1691 the province of New York was redivided into ten counties—namely, New York, Westchester, Ulster, Albany, Dutchess, Orange. Richmond, Kings, Queens, and Suffolk. Cornwall county, in Maine, and Dukes county, in Massachusetts, forming a part of the domain of New York, were transferred to those colonies under its new charter. The French
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, State of (search)
enate and Assembly, deriving their powers from the The Constitution House, Kingston. same source; all inferior offices to be filled by the governor and a council of four senators, one from each district; and to a council of revision, similarly constituted, was assigned the power to pass upon the validity and constitutionality of legislative acts. In October following, a British marauding force went up the Hudson and burned Kingston. The records were removed first to the interior of Ulster county, and thence to Poughkeepsie, where the legislators reassembled early in 1778. That city was the State capital until 1784, when it was removed to the city of New York. In 1797 Albany was made the permanent State capital. The State constitution was revised in 1801, 1821, 1846, and 1894. During the War of 1812-15 the frontiers of New York were almost continually scenes of hostilities. New York was the Seal of the State of New York. pioneer in establishing canal navigation, In 1796 t
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