Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) or search for Ship Island (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

ps into the bay. He was cool and brave throughout, never losing his self-possession. This man was captured early in the war in a fine fishing-smack which he owned, and though he protested that he had no interest in the war, and only asked for the privilege of fishing for the fleet, yet his services were too valuable to the captors as a pilot not to be secured. He was appointed a first-class pilot, and has served us with zeal and fidelity, and has lost his vessel, which went to pieces on Ship Island. I commend him to the Department. It gives me pleasure to refer to several officers who volunteered to take any situation where they might be useful, some of whom were on their way North, either by orders of the Department, or condemned by medical survey. The reports of the different commanders will show how they conducted themselves. I have already mentioned Lieutenant Commander Perkins of the Chickasaw, and Lieutenant Yates of the Augusta. Acting Volunteer Lieutenant William Ha
tant fire upon the Mexican vessels crossing and recrossing the river. The old salt was a few miles wrong in his reckoning; for he afterward stated that he thought he was peppering away at the damned rebels in Boca Chica instead of the harmless Mexicans on the Rio Grande, so that we shall probably have to make an apology for the slight mistake of firing upon their vessels while engaged in a contraband trade with the rebels on the Texan shore. Those of your readers who have ever visited Ship Island can have a good idea of this barren, inhospitable shore. Brazos, as well as all the islands along the Texan coast, is a sandy desert. One house (deserted) stands to our right, and a mile or so farther toward the interior are two lighthouses, one on each side. Charred ruins show that three dwellings were destroyed by fire some time ago. Nothing but the chimneys remain standing. The foundations of the buildings used by General Taylor for stores can yet be seen; but no other vestige rema