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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Cape Florida (Florida, United States) or search for Cape Florida (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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ge. The publishers purpose presenting the naval operations during our civil war in three volumes. The first would naturally comprise events precedent and immediate, and as many of these transpired within the Capes of Virginia, they and matters of primary interest, and matters relating to blockaders and blockade-runners, will be found in the volume written by Professor Soley, U. S. Navy. This volume, which may be regarded as the second, treats of naval operations from Cape Hatteras to Cape Florida, along the coasts, and within the sounds, rivers, and harbors of this watershed. As an actuality, two centres of operations existed : the one at Port Royal, the depot of supplies and usual headquarters of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron; the other within the sounds, and on the coast of North Carolina, over which the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron held watch. In order to avoid confusion, the events of each section are treated separately. It may be added that the writer c
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: condition of the Navy at the beginning of the war. (search)
acking us without reasonable pretext, prevented armed intervention, as it would have been called. At home we had what were known as sympathizers, spies, and even traitors in the civil services, who obtained the most accurate information of intended movements and gave it to the enemy. Certainly the skies were dark for years, yet through all the difficulties and shortcomings the nation supported its existence with fearful cost of life and treasure. Beyond the Capes of Virginia and to Cape Florida, in relation to which this volume treats, a blockade, first of form and later of fact, was being established, but so far as hostile guns of opposing forces were concerned within this region they opened first at Hatteras Inlet, more than four months after the war had taken definite shape. The capture of Hatteras Inlet seemed at first of little import to the military mind, but it grew in its proportions, and as will be seen by the following chapters, was no mean event, more important, too
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter VIII Hatteras InletRoanoke Island. (search)
Virginia presented no inconsiderable field of operations; then again, as soon after the capture of Hatteras Inlet as a force could be got together, followed a much larger expedition for the capture of Port Royal and further operations east of Cape Florida. The coasts bordering on the Gulf of Mexico and upper waters of the Mississippi were no less theatres of armed contention. Important as was the possession of Hatteras Inlet, it need not be a subject of wonder that nothing further grew out forces along the entire North Carolina coast except Wilmington. Including what was soon after achieved by Flag-Officer Dupont, on the coast of Georgia and Florida, Charleston and Wilmington were the only entrances unclosed from Cape Henry to Cape Florida. The army followed the scattered forces of the Confederates, and on the northern part of the island received the surrender of a considerable number, making a total of 2,677, including the wounded. A considerable number had effected their e