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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 48 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 31 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Point Lookout, Md. (Maryland, United States) or search for Point Lookout, Md. (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Personal reminiscences of the last days of Lee and his Paladins. (search)
attached some very fine teams which had been impressed for that purpose. These were carried off, about an hundred ambulances were burned and a number of wagons, and a number of horses and mules were shot, and the road so obstructed that it was several hours before we could recommence our march. There were no killed amongst our men, and only our brave quartermaster wounded. I was told he had an arm broken. The casualties amongst my little party I must now recite: Venable died at Point Lookout; Tucker is now (March, 1890), with Dr. George Starke, and Romulus somewhere in New York. Tucker, Romulus and Venable, as I said, were taken from my buggy and made prisoners. The subsequent history of Romulus is not without interest, but I cannot introduce it in this place. Doctors Hume Field, R. Lewis and J. P. Smith, the former two known to some of you present, escaped into the woods and returned just as I came up. A young officer, a Captain Riddick, who was in my commissary wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
Adams, Paul V., Second Sergeant. Barksdale, Claiborne G. Barksdale, Armistead, First Lieutenant. Barksdale, E. Henry. Bouldin, Powhatan. Bouldin, Robert C. Bouldin, Breckenridge C., Second Lieutenant and Adjutant 14th Virginia Cavalry. Killed at Brandy Station. Bouldin, E. E., First Lieutenant, then Captain from April, 1862, until May, 1865. Wounded at Williamsport, July 14th, 1863. Bouldin, Thomas T., Jr. Bouldin, John E. Beirne, Andrew, died in prison at Point Lookout. From Monroe county, West Virginia. Baldwin, Samuel. Bailey, Dr. L. P. Booker, John, from Prince Edward county. Bouldin, W. O. Cardwell, Toby. Chafin, Robert. Carrington, Robert. Caperton, Allen, wounded at Stevenson's depot. From Monroe county, West Virginia. Chappell, Henry C., Sergeant, wounded at Gettysburg, on July 30, 1863. Clarkson, R. A. Chick, Henry, killed in the service, 1861, N. W. Va. Cronin, Robert W. Chappell, Wash B., wounded at Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Very complete roll [from the Richmond, A., Dispatch, September 16th, 1900.] (search)
arch 24, 1865. Surrendered at Fort Steadman and in prison at Point Lookout, Md., three months. Hamman, George C.—Third Corporal. Electedoned at Camp Chase four months, Fort Delaware eight months, and Point Lookout three months. Kneisley, Lewis C.—Fourth Corporal. Wounded Med at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. In prison at Fort Delaware and Point Lookout twenty-one months. Transferred from Company C, 10th Virginia InWarrenton Junction. In prison at Fort McHenry one month and at Point Lookout seventeen months. Transferred to 7th Virginia Cavalry. Resides25, 1862. Surrendered at Nye river, May 19, 1864. Prisoner at Point Lookout and Elmira ten months. Resides at Baltimore, Md., and is editorry. Surrendered at Fort Steadman, March 25, 1865. Prisoner at Point Lookout three months. Resides at Troy, Mo. Hollenback, Samuel—Teamstand surrendered at Nye river, May 19, 1864. Prisoner of war at Point Lookout and Elmira ten months. Is still on parole. Miley, Joseph R.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate States Navy and a brief history of what became of it. [from the Richmond, Va. Times December 30, 1900.] (search)
fall of that city in 1865. Pontchartrain—Side-wheel river steamer, mounted seven guns. Burned by Confederates in 1863 on the Arkansas river. Queen of the West—Iron-protected ram. Captured from the Federals, February 14th, 1863, in Red river and sunk in battle in Atchafalaya river in April, 1863. Raleigh—Iron-clad, four guns; built at Wilmington in 1864 and wrecked on Wilmington bar, May 7, 1864. Rappahannock—Side-wheel river steamer, formerly the Saint Nicholas. Captured at Point Lookout, June 29, 1861, mounted one gun. Burned by the Confederates at Fredericksburg, April, 1862. Rappahannock-Cruiser, formerly the British gun-boat Victoria. Purchased at London in 1863 and taken to Calais, but on account of complications with the French Government she never put to sea, and was finally sold in 1864. Resolute—Wooden gun-boat, one gun. Destroyed by Federal field battery at the fall of Savannah in 1864. Richmond—Iron-clad, four guns. Launched at Gosport Navy Yar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
James A. Jackson; —— ——Johnson, wounded at Hatcher's Run. George Kesee, killed at Williamsburg. John T. Lowry, wounded at Hatcher's Run; John Lawson; Thos. Lawson; George W. Lawson; Sandy Lyle, lost sight of after battle of Gaines's Mill; Mat. L. Lyle, second captain, killed at Gaines' Mill; Robert Lipscomb, killed at Gaines' Mill; John Ledbetter, wounded at Drewry's Bluff; W. J. Ledbetter; —— —— Lindsey. Dennis McNamara; A. C. Middleton, wounded at——; Clem. Maloney, died at Point Lookout, Md., of wounds received at Gettysburg; David Morisette, died in service; Sam Morrison, killed in battle around Richmond; John E. Moseley, killed at Seven Pines; Thomas Mack, orderly; Robert Moorefield; John Morrisette; William Morrison, died in service. William Nowell. James T. Overby, transferred to cavalry. Edward Preston, died in service; Fletcher Preston; John F. Powers; Joseph Pollard; Asa C. Pugh; Presley A. Pugh; William W. Palmer. Edward H. Reams; Elijah T.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.31 (search)
o quarter, and they began shelling poor and gallant Fort Gregg. After an hour's hard fighting the garrison of 160 Mississippians and 80 artillerists serving as infantry and two guns, assailed by one or two divisions of Ord's corps, inflicted a loss of about 1000 in killed and wounded. The loss in the fort was about 50 or 60 men. After being removed from the fort we were taken near Grant's observatory, where each man's name and command was taken by a federal officer, seated in an open buggy, who, to say the least, was the biggest ruffian it was the writer's misfortune to meet. From there we were taken to City Point, and from there to Point Lookout, Md., and remained until the end of July, 1865, when we were paroled. It is pleasant to say that after all these long years the four members of the Donaldsonville Artillery who were engaged in this desperate struggle are still living and in fair health, two residing in Assumption parish, one in Ascension and the fourth in New Orleans.