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P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various). You can also browse the collection for Dryden (Canada) or search for Dryden (Canada) in all documents.

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my life employ'd in pleasing thee. Crown'd with my songs of thee, each day shall move, And ev'ry list'ning son hear nought but love; With flowing numbers ev'ry page shall roll, Where, as you read my verse, receive my soul. Should sense, and wit, and art refuse to join In all I write, and fail my great design, Yet with such passion shall my lines be crown'd, And so much softness in my poem found, Such moving tenderness, the world shall see, Love could have been describ'd by none but me. Let Dryden from his works with justice claim Immortal praise! I from my sacred flame Draw all my glory, challenge all my fame. Believe me, Delia, lovers have their wars, And Cupid has his camp as well as Mars. That age which suits a soldier best, will prove The fittest for the sharp fatigues of love; None but young men the toils of war can bear, None but young men can serve and please the fair; Youth with the foe maintains the vig'rous fight, Youth gives the longing maid the full delight. On either han
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy IV: To His Mistress, whose husband is invited to a feast with him. The poet instructed her how to behave herself in his company. By Dryden. (search)
Elegy IV: To His Mistress, whose husband is invited to a feast with him. The poet instructed her how to behave herself in his company. By Dryden. Your husband will be with us at the treat, May that be the last supper he shall eat. And am poor I, a guest invited there, Only to see, while he may touch the fair? To see you kiss, and hug your nauseous lord, While his lewd hand descends below the board? No wonder that Hippodamia's charms, At such a sight, the Centaurs urg'd to arms: That in a rage, they threw their cups aside, Assail'd the bridegroom, and would force the bride. I am not half a horse, (I would I were :) Yet hardly can from you my hands forbear. Take, then, my counsel; which observ'd, may be, Of some importance both to you and me. Be sure to come before your man be there, There's nothing can be done, but come howe'er. Sit next him, (that belongs to decency;) But tread upon my foot in passing by. Read in my looks what silently they speak, And slily, with your eyes, your an