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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 37 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Queenston (Canada) or search for Queenston (Canada) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brock, Sir Isaac, 1769- (search)
rt of the province. He soon led quite a large body of them, and captured Detroit (q. v.). He also personally led the troops in the battle of Queenston, where he was killed, Oct. 13, 1812. The British government caused a fine monument to be erected to his memory in St. Paul's Cathedral. London. bearing the following inscription: Erected at the public expense to the memory of Maj.-Gen. Sir Isaac Brock, who gloriously fell on the 13th of October, Mdcccxii., in resisting an attack on Queenston, Upper Canada. To the four surviving brothers of Brock 12.000 acres of land in Canada were given, and a pension of $1,000 a year each for life. In 1816 the Canadians struck a medal to his memory, and on the Heights of Queenston they raised a beautiful Tuscan column 135 feet in height. In the base of the monument a tomb was formed, in which the general's remains repose. They were taken to this last resting-place from Fort George on Oct. 13, 1824. A small monument marks the place where he fell
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buffalo, (search)
western extremity of the Erie Canal; has extensive lake commerce with all western points, large live-stock and grain trade, and important manufactures; population in 1890, 255,664; in 1900, 352,387. General Riall, with his regulars and Indians, recrossed from Lewiston (see Niagara, Fort), when his forces had returned from the desolation of the New York frontier. Full license had been given to his Indians, and the desolation was made perfect almost to Black Rock. Riall marched up from Queenston (Dec. 28) to Chippewa, Lieutenant-General Drummond in immediate command. By this time all western New York had been alarmed. McClure had appealed to the people to hasten to the frontier. Gen. Amos Hall called out the militia and invited volunteers. Hall took chief command of troops now gathered at Black Rock and Buffalo, 2,000 strong. From Drummond's camp, opposite Black Rock, Riall crossed the river (Dec. 30) with about 1,000 white men and Indians. The night was dark. They drove th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burns, John, 1793-1872 (search)
Burns, John, 1793-1872 Military officer; born in Burlington, N. J., Sept. 5, 1793; served in the War of 1812-15, taking part in the engagements at Plattsburg, Queenston, and Lund's Lane. He endeavored to enlist for the Mexican War, but being rejected on account of his age went with the army as a teamster. In 1863, when the Confederate scouts entered Gettysburg, he joined a party to oppose them, but was turned back by the National cavalry. He took an active part in the subsequent battle of Gettysburg, and when the report of his participation reached the Northern States it aroused much interest and he was hailed as the hero of Gettysburg. He died in Gettysburg, Pa., Feb. 7, 1872.
f the country. At the opening of the third year of the second war for independence, a favorite project with the United States government was the conquest of Canada. The principal military forces in Upper Canada were under Lieutenant-General Drummond. When the Army of the North, commanded by Major-General Brown, reached the Niagara frontier, Drummond's headquarters were at Burlington Heights, at the western end of Lake Ontario. General Riall was on the Niagara River, at Fort George and Queenston; but when lie heard of the arrival of the Americans at Buffalo, under General Scott, he advanced to Chippewa and established a fortified camp. At the close of June, General Brown arrived at Buffalo, and assumed chief command, and, believing his army to be strong enough, he proceeded to invade Canada. His army consisted of two brigades, commanded respectively by Generals Scott and Ripley, to each of which was attached a train of artillery, commanded by Capt. N. Towson and Maj. J. Hindma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Izard, George 1777-1828 (search)
10, urging him to move on to his support, as he had not more than 2,000 effective men. The first division of Izard's troops arrived at Lewiston on Oct. 5. He moved up to Black Rock, crossed the Niagara River, Oct. 10-11, and encamped 2 miles north of Fort Erie. Ranking General Brown, he took the chief command of the combined forces, then numbering, with volunteers and militia, about 8,000 men. He prepared to march against Drummond, who, after the sortie at Fort Erie, had moved down to Queenston. Izard moved towards Chippewa, and vainly endeavored to draw Drummond out. He had some skirmishing in an attempt to destroy a quantity of grain belonging to the British, in which he lost twelve men killed and fifty-four wounded; the British lost many more. Drummond fell hack to Fort George and Burlington Heights. Perceiving further operations in that region to be useless, and perhaps perilous, Izard crossed the river and abandoned Canada. Knowing Fort Erie to be of little service, he c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lundy's Lane, battle of. (search)
m the battleground at Chippewa, July 5, 1814, the British general, Riall, fled down the borders of the Niagara River to Queenston, put some of his troops in Fort George, and made his headquarters near the lake, 20 miles westward. Drummond was mortid to meet the latter. In the mean time Brown, after burying the dead and caring for the wounded, had moved forward to Queenston and menaced Fort George. He expected to see Chauncey with his squadron on the Niagara River to co-operate with him, buligence reached him that Drummond, with 1,000 men, many of them Wellington's veterans, had landed at Lewiston, opposite Queenston, with a view to seizing the American stores at Schlosser, above the falls. Brown ordered Scott to march rapidly with ary (consisting of five brass cannon) but failed, even after being reinforced by 1,500 men sent forward by Drummond from Queenston. Meanwhile, General Scott had been fighting desperately but successfully, and had been severely wounded by a musket-ba
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Niagara, Fort (search)
part of them invalids, were bayonetted after resistance had ceased. This horrid work was performed on Sunday, Dec. 19. The loss of the Americans was eighty killed—many of them hospital patients—fourteen wounded, and 344 made prisoners. The British loss was six men killed, and Colonel Murray, three men, and a Fort Niagara, from form George, in 1812. surgeon wounded. The British fired a signal-cannon, announcing their success, which put in motion a detachment of regulars and Indians at Queenston for further work of destruction. They crossed the river to Lewiston, and plundered and laid waste the whole New York frontier to Buffalo. In 1814, on the retirement of General Wilkinson, General Brown, who had been promoted to major-general, became commander-in-chief of the Northern Department. He had left French Mills (Feb. 15), on the Salmon River, where the army had wintered, with most of the troops there (2,000 in number), and on reaching Sackett's Harbor received an order from th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Queenston, battle of. (search)
Queenston, battle of. The unfortunate armistice signed by Dearborn in 1812, so delayed preparations for war on the Niagara frontier that General Van Rensselaer f only 700 men there on Sept. 1. His headquarters were at Lewiston, opposite Queenston. He had been promised 5,000 men at that time, and was charged with the doublry on Lewiston Heights responded, when the British fled towards the village Queenston in 1812. of Queenston. They were followed by regulars, under Capt. John E. WQueenston. They were followed by regulars, under Capt. John E. Wool, who pushed gallantly up the hill, pressed the British back to the plateau on which Queenston stands, and finally gained possession of Queenston Heights. ColonelQueenston stands, and finally gained possession of Queenston Heights. Colonel Van Rensselaer had followed with militia, but was so severely wounded that he was compelled to relinquish the command and return to Lewiston. A bullet had passed tbout nine o'clock. Gen. Sir Issac Brock was at Fort George, 7 miles below Queenston, when the firing began. He hastened to the scene of action with his staff an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sheaffe, Sir Roger Hale 1763-1851 (search)
Sheaffe, Sir Roger Hale 1763-1851 Military officer; born in Boston, Mass., July 15, 1763. Earl Percy made his headquarters at the house of the mother of young Sheaffe, and he provided for the lad a military education and a commission in a regiment of foot in 1773. Sheaffe performed various military services in Europe, and in 1812 went to Canada with the rank of major-general. After the fall of Brock at Queenston, Sheaffe took command of the forces and gained a victory there. For this service he was knighted (Jan. 16, 1813). In April of the same year he defended York, and was made a full general in 1828. He died in Edinburgh, Scotland, July 17, 1851.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Rensselaer, Solomon 1774-1852 (search)
sselaer. Wayne, Aug. 20, 1794, was shot through the lungs. From 1801 to 1810 he was adjutant-general of New York militia. He was lieutenant-colonel of New York volunteers in 1812, and commanded the troops that attacked those of the British at Queenston, Oct. 13 of that year. At the landing-place he received four wounds, and had to be carried back to Lewiston. From 1819 to 1822 he was a member of Congress, and from 1822 until 1839 postmaster at Albany. He published a Narrative of the affair1801 to 1810 he was adjutant-general of New York militia. He was lieutenant-colonel of New York volunteers in 1812, and commanded the troops that attacked those of the British at Queenston, Oct. 13 of that year. At the landing-place he received four wounds, and had to be carried back to Lewiston. From 1819 to 1822 he was a member of Congress, and from 1822 until 1839 postmaster at Albany. He published a Narrative of the affair at Queenston (1836). He died in Albany, N. Y., April 23, 1852.