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T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 4 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Thornton (United Kingdom) or search for Thornton (United Kingdom) in all documents.

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T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 6 (search)
se and look: you'll soon see. SCELEDRUS May I go? PERIPLECOMENUS Why, I command you; go and examine at your leisure. SCELEDRUS I am determined to do so. Goes into the house of PERIPLECOMENUS. PERIPLECOMENUS probably looking up to a window in the CAPTAIN'S house. Ho! PhilocomasiumPhilocomasium: Directly Sceledrus turns his back, the old man calls out for Philocomasium, who is supposed at that moment to be in the Captain's house. How he does so is somewhat of a mystery to the Commentators. Thornton, in his translation, suggests that he calls through the window, where it is natural to imagine that Philocomasium might be stationed within hearing to observe all that passed. He could hardly, however, call "through" the window of the ground floor, as these were generally more than six feet from the ground; and, indeed, there were rarely any windows at all on the basement. It is most likely that Philocomasium is hidden behind the "clatri" or "lattice" of the window in her room on the first-
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 3 (search)
nt what you say. For that reason, i' faith, the thing will be able to be managed all the more cleverly. ACROTELEUTIUM Can you only find me the man, and then be easy as to the rest? If I don't make a fool of the fellow, do you lay all the blame on me. PALAESTRIO Well, go you in then; apply yourselves to this business with all your skill. ACROTELEUTIUM Trust me for thatTrust me for that: "Alia cura;" literally, "take care of something else; meaning, "trust us in the present instance," or, as Thornton expresses it, "never fear us.". PALAESTRIO Come, Periplecomenus, do you conduct them at once in-doors. I'm off to the Forum; I'll meet him, and give him this ring, and will tell him that it has been delivered to me from your wife, and that she is dying for him. As soon as we shall have come from the Forum, do you send her (points to MILPHIDIPPA) to our house as though she were privately sent to him. PERIPLECOMENUS We'll do so; trust us for that. PALAESTRIO Do you only attend to the busines