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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 10 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 6 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 4 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Vulcan (Romania) or search for Vulcan (Romania) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 4, line 167 (search)
once whatever may transpire, witnessed the loves of Mars and Venus. Grieved to know the wrong, he called the son of Juno, Vulcan, and gave full knowledge of the deed, showing how Mars and Venus shamed his love, as they defiled his bed. Vulcan amazed,Vulcan amazed,— the nimble-thoughted Vulcan lost his wits, so that he dropped the work his right hand held. But turning from all else at once he set to file out chains of brass, delicate, fine, from which to fashion nets invisible, filmy of mesh and airy as the thVulcan lost his wits, so that he dropped the work his right hand held. But turning from all else at once he set to file out chains of brass, delicate, fine, from which to fashion nets invisible, filmy of mesh and airy as the thread of insect-web, that from the rafter swings.— Implicit woven that they yielded soft the slightest movement or the gentlest touch, with cunning skill he drew them round the bed where they were sure to dally. Presently appeared the faithless wife, ed in the chains they could not thence arise, nor could they else but lie in strict embrace,— cunningly thus entrapped by Vulcan's wit.— At once the Lemnian cuckold opened wide the folding ivory doors and called the Gods,— to witness. There they l
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 13, line 313 (search)
“Nor am I to be blamed, if Vulcan's isle of Lemnos has become the residence of Philoctetes. Greeks, defend yourselves, for you agreed to it! Yes, I admit I urged him to withdraw from toils of war and those of travel and attempt by rest to ease his cruel pain. He took my advice and lives! The advice was not alone well meant (that would have been enough) but it was wise. Because our prophets have declared, he must lead us, if we may still maintain our hope for Troy's destruction—therefore, you must not intrust that work to me. Much better, send the son of Telamon. His eloquence will overcome the hero's rage, most fierce from his disease and anger: or else his invention of some wile will skilfully deliver him to us.—The Simois will first flow backward, Ida stand without its foliage, and Achaia promise aid to Troy itself; ere, lacking aid from me, the craft of stupid Ajax will avail. “Though, Philoctetes, you should be enraged against your friends, against the king and me; although you c