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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 3 1 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.5 (search)
h not particularly brilliant in any special thing that I can remember, held my own as head of the school. When the Eisteddfod was held at Rhuddlan in 1851, I was the one chosen to represent the genius of the school; but, soon after the nomination, I fell ill of measles, and Toomis succeeded to the honour. Apropos of this: exactly forty years later I was invited to preside over one of the meetings of the Eisteddfod, held at Swansea, but as I was preparing for this honour, a fall at Murren, Switzerland, resulted in the fracture of my left leg, which rendered my appearance impossible. The other boys in the school consisted of the dunces, the indolent, the malingerers, the would-be truants, the dull, the noisy, the fat-witted majority, just six times more numerous than the naturally-able boys. This proportion of one in six is very common in the world. In ships that I have sailed in, among the military companions with whom I have campaigned, among the blacks and the whites of my A
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.24 (search)
ud, retiring very early, as Stanley had the African habit of rising at six. I persuaded Stanley sometimes to play at cards, but he never much cared to do so; he not only thought cards a great waste of time, but he also thought playing for money discreditable; he wanted all the time he could get for reading, or planning something he meant to do, or write. He was, in fact, an inveterate worker. We were returning to England at the end of August, when Stanley, in a damp mountain-meadow at Murren, slipped and broke his left ankle. He suffered a good deal, the injury bringing on malaria; but the bone united without shortening the leg, and, in time, the lameness disappeared. This accident prevented his presiding at the Eisteddfod. On the 2nd October, Stanley went to Ostend, by invitation of the King of the Belgians. Mr. Mounteney Jephson accompanied him. Stanley wrote to me:-- The King does not look greyer than I remember him during the last two years. He tells me he will be