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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 22 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
ed the limit of Congo navigation, and found camp at Yambuya, a large village, situated on the edge of an unknow pass before the entire force could be collected at Yambuya. If Emin was in such desperate straits as he had dt course. On the thirteenth day after arrival at Yambuya, the advance, consisting of five Europeans and threrial Forest. The unknown country which lay between Yambuya and the Albert Nyanza, on whose shores we hoped to iors. On the hundred and thirty-seventh day from Yambuya we reached the first native settlement that had bee13th December, one hundred and sixty-nine days from Yambuya, the expedition stood on the edge of the grassy plaew of the village of Banalya, ninety miles east of Yambuya. Presently, Contrary to the rule hitherto obsey Falls, and in the tenth month, he had brought to Yambuya four hundred men and boy carriers, and a more undisries of losses attending ten months of camp-life at Yambuya. This refers to the Rear-Column.--D. S. The
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
only give deep discords. The days went by, and I feared I should have to relegate my book to the uncertain future. At last I started on the Forest chapter, the writing of which relieved me of the acuter feeling. Then I began the March from Yambuya ; and, presently, I warmed to the work, flung off page after page, and never halted until I had reached The Albert. The stronger emotions being thus relieved, I essayed the beginning, and found by the after-reading that I was not over-fantasticngo as my painful and long journey through the Forest had made them appear. Without any great cost it will be possible for the State to send expeditions to Lake Albert from the Congo within ten days. For, when saw-mills have been established at Yambuya, a wooden tram-line, topped by light steel bars, may be laid very easily along the Aruwimi, over which a small engine, drawing five trucks, could travel five miles an hour, or sixty miles a day. But before this tram-line will be possible, the ra