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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 12 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs) 2 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Theogony 2 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge). You can also browse the collection for Mount Ida (Jamaica) or search for Mount Ida (Jamaica) in all documents.

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Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1 (search)
n reverence of the gods,] and a noble daughter, her mother's pride, called Eido in her infancy. But when she came to youth, the season of marriage, she was called Theonoe; for she knew whatever the gods design, both present and to come, having received this honor from her grandfather Nereus. My own fatherland, Sparta, is not without fame, and my father is Tyndareus; but there is indeed a story that Zeus flew to my mother Leda, taking the form of a bird, a swan, which accomplished the deceitful union, fleeing the pursuit of an eagle, if this story is true. My name is Helen; I will tell the evils I have suffered. For the sake of beauty, three goddesses came to a deep valley on Mount Ida, to Paris: Hera and Kypris, and the virgin daughter of Zeus, wishing to have the judgment of their loveliness decided. Kypris offered my beauty, if misfortune is beautiful, for Paris to marry, and so she won. Paris, the shepherd of Ida, left his ox-stalls and came to Sparta, to have me in marriage.
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1319 (search)
Chorus When the mother ceased from her wild wandering toil, searching for the treacherous rape of her daughter, she crossed the snow-capped heights of the nymphs of Mount Ida; and in sorrow cast herself down in the rocky woods deep in snow; and, by not making fruitful with crops the barren fields of the earth for mortals, she destroyed the human race. She would not send forth the rich nourishment of leafy tendrils for the herds, and life was leaving the cities. No sacrifice was offered to the gods, and on the altars were no cakes to burn; she made the dew-fed springs of clear water cease flowing, the avenger in sorrow for her child.