Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Boston Harbor (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
isible, from Nova Scotia to Newburyport, in the spring-time of 1805; whose arrival was the unsuspected event of the year in the third city of Massachusetts The seal of the province of New Brunswick is a ship nearing port under full sail, with the legend. Spem redurit.—for the six or seven thousand inhabitants were celebrating rather the building of the new Court House on the Mall, the founding of the Social Library, and the opening of Plum Island turnpike and bridge, or making careful note of the thirty days drought in July and August. On the 10th of December, The town records say the 12th. in a little frame house, still standing on School Street, between the First Presbyterian Church, in which Whitefield's remains are interred, and the house in which the great preacher died,—and so in the very bosom of orthodoxy,—a man-child was born to Abijah and Fanny Lib. 4.15. Garrison, and called, after an uncle who subsequently lost his life in Boston harbor, William Lloyd Garr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
N. H., which was opened in the fall of 1834 to colored youth on equal terms with white (Lib. 4.38, 169). of Rogers's neighbor, John Farmer, the antiquarian; of Farmer's Lib. 4.175. constant correspondent in Boston, Francis Jackson; Francis Jackson was born in Newton, Mass., in 1789, and became the historian of that town. His father, Timothy Jackson, was a minute-man who joined in the pursuit of the retreating British on April 19. 1775. He himself was a soldier at Fort Warren in Boston harbor in the War of 1812. He early took an active part in the municipal affairs of Boston, and directed some of its chief territorial improvements, but did not seek office. He was a very tower of strong will, solid judgment, shrewd forecast, sturdy common sense; sparing of words, yet a master of terse, homely English; simple and frugal in his habits, but charitable and hospitable in an unusual degree. He was one of John Pierpont's parishioners, at Hollis-Street Church, vigorously taking his
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
His brother-editor of the Commercial Gazette, however, knew Boston better when, with reference to this very movement on the part of the abolitionists, he called on all good citizens to combine for Lib. 5.105. the purpose of putting down their nefarious transactions; and again, on the 4th of July, when, the editor of the Liberator delivering an address at Julien Hall, the Gazette proposed throwing the mischievous Garrison Lib. 5.109. and his hearers overboard like the tea spilt in Boston Harbor during the Revolution. A cold bath would do them good. Two influences Boston could not escape: one, the example of Congress in repressing free speech; the other, the example of sister cities carried away by Southern panic. On February 2, Mr. Dickson, of New York, Lib. 5.26, 30. presented in the House of Representatives the petition of eight hundred ladies for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, and, in a favorable speech, asserting the power of Congress in the p