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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 22: operations in the Potomac.--destruction of Confederate batteries.--losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc. (search)
ith Merrimac, March 8, 1862. Cumberland Sloop. 24 1,726 do. Whitehall Steamer. 4 323 At Old Point, March 9, 1862, by fire. M. J. Carlton Mortar Schooner 3 178 Attack on Forts Jackson and St. Philip, April 19, 1862. Varuna Steamer. 9 1,300 In action with confederate gun-boats below New Orleans, April 24, 1862. Sidney C. Jones. Mortar schooner 3 245 Grounded below Vicksburg and burned to prevent falling into the hands of the enemy. Island Belle Steamer. 2 123 Grounded in Appomattox river June, 1862, and burned to prevent falling into the hands of the enemy. Adirondack Screw sloop. 9 1,240 Wrecked near Abaco, Aug. 23, 1862. Henry Andrew Steamer. 3 177 Wrecked in a gale near Cape Henry Aug. 24, 1862. Sumter Steam Ram. 2 400 Grounded in Mississippi river and abaudoned.     112 7,908   Vessels added since fourth of March, eighteen hundred and sixty-one. (exclusive of those lost.)   No. of Vessels. Guns. Tons. By purchase 180 688 86,910 By transfer
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
ls had on hand, they were able to put a stop to the traffic which alone kept the Confederate armies in the field. During the war, over $30,000,000 worth of this kind of property was seized and turned into the Treasury — not a tithe of its value, for a large portion of it went into the possession of land-sharks, who rarely gave a fair account of the money which passed through their hands. But when the big holes and the small leaks on the blockade were all closed up, the tale was told at Appomattox, where General Grant had to serve out rations to Lee's soldiers and give them enough to enable them to reach their homes. A launch and cutter from the Sagamore and others from the Fort Henry, including an ambulance boat, were added to this expedition and the whole force proceeded direct to Bayport, while the Sagamore remained in the offing to prevent the escape of Confederate vessels. Great difficulties attended this expedition, as the weather was very unfavorable, but the main objec
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
of May Beauregard attacked Butler's advanced position in front of Drury's Bluff, and Butler was forced back into his intrenchments between the James and the Appomattox Rivers; thereupon Beauregard intrenched himself strongly in his front, covering the city of Richmond from any further attempts of Butler in that direction. This prtely hors du combat as if he were enclosed in a bottle with the cork in. General Butler held his position, although he had the naval vessels on the James and Appomattox Rivers to cover his retreat to his transports, in case of further molestation from Beauregard. These military movements are mentioned merely to show the position and, wherever practicable, they were destroyed, making the waterways comparatively safe, and enabling General Butler to reoccupy his line from Trent's Beach to Appomattox. On the 18th of May the enemy commenced fortifying the heights about Howlett's House, commanding Trent's Reach, on the James; and although the gun-boats kept
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 54: capture of Richmond.--the destruction of the Confederate fleet in the James River, etc. (search)
st liberal arrangements that could be entered into for the surrender of the Confederate armies; and while Mr. Lincoln had implicit confidence in Grant's military abilities, he relied no less on his good judgment and kind feeling, and it is fortunate that the last act in the bloody drama of the civil war was under the direction of the two men acting in perfect accord, whose names will be handed down to posterity with increase of honor as the years roll by. When General Lee surrendered at Appomattox the work of the North Atlantic Squadron was over, for all the James River region was in the hands of the Federals. Up to that time the squadron in Trent's Reach was quietly holding the Confederate iron-clads, under the command of Raphael Semmes-recently created Rear-Admiral--above Drury's Bluff, where they were quite harmless and would either have to be blown up or surrendered. Admiral Semmes assumed command of the James River fleet on the 18th of February, 1865, relieving Commodore J.