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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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n's line, Foes for a day and brothers for all time epitomized the calmer feeling of the victorious section, and Judge Finch's The blue and the gray so perfectly echoed the generosity of both North and South that it became a national classic. Appomattox was hardly a half-dozen years in the past when a bill of general amnesty was passed by Congress. Carl Schurz made a notable speech on the subject, and though his proposals were more liberal than the majority was willing to adopt, the debate shuthern leader in the progress of nationalization was Henry W. Grady, of Georgia. His father, a Confederate soldier on the staff of General Gordon, met his death at Petersburg in the attack on Fort Stedman only two weeks before the surrender at Appomattox. Yet the son looked back on the conflict with no feeling of bitterness. With the eyes of a statesman and the heart of a patriot, he lent his great energy, his talent for organization, his influence as a journalist to fostering the spirit of a
f Donelson. From that hour until the closing triumph at Appomattox he was the leader whose name was the harbinger of victorand make no offensive remarks. After Lee's surrender at Appomattox, when our batteries began to fire triumphal salutes, he iloh, on the heights of Chattanooga, amid the glories of Appomattox, and as those war-scarred veterans looked with uncoveredlemish,—imposing, dignified, simple, heroic. I refer to Appomattox. Two men met that day, representative of American civilinevitable. Then, suddenly, came the dramatic climax at Appomattox,—dramatic, I say, not theatrical,—severe in its simple, itself,—posterity formulate its own verdict. Surviving Appomattox but a little more than five years, those years were not ss, Andrew Johnson called for indictments; and, one Appomattox—in the sunshine of peace The quaint costumes of the gture of a common country. The record of the South since Appomattox shows how faithfully its sons have kept the terms acc
for eight hours in the desperate and determined contest. The brigade commander reported: It was empathically a hand-to-hand fight. Scores were shot down within a few feet of the death-dealing muskets. After battling all the way down to Petersburg, the Fifth Vermont was suddenly rushed to Washington to repel Early's attack. It then engaged in the thrilling victories of Sheridan in the Valley. In December, it returned to Petersburg and ended its active service only with the surrender at Appomattox. During these four years of service, the regiment lost eleven officers and 202 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and one officer and 124 enlisted men by disease. Its total loss was therefore 338, worthy of the famous Vermont Brigade. Lyrics: battle-hymn of the republic The unusual circumstances under which this national classic was written are recounted under the picture of the Fifth Vermont in 1861, with their Colonel, L. A. Grant, on the immediately preceding page. Mi
on at Five Forks, and took nearly five thousand prisoners. The next morning, April 2d, the Petersburg entrenchments were carried by storm. The day after, the whole Confederate army was hastening westward. Seven days after this engagement came Appomattox. Lee's valiant hosts were indeed scattered, returning to their homes in a land that was once more united. ‘The valiant hosts are scattered’ The conquered banner—waving free in 1861: ‘once ten thousands hailed it gladly’ The first eneral E. R. S. Canby. Canby had advanced from Dauphine Island, at the entrance to Mobile Bay, to the Spanish Fort across from Mobile and had reduced it on April 8th, marching into the deserted works on the day that General Lee surrendered at Appomattox. At the same time, General Frederick Steele had advanced from Pensacola against Blakely, a little farther north than the Spanish Fort, and had captured it on the afternoon of Lee's surrender. On the morning of May 12th the Union forces und
hole warring nation within his love, and has won for him the homage of a reunited people. Though delivered little more than a month before the closing scene at Appomattox, it voices no exultation in the triumph of a cause dear to his heart, but with infinite pity and a truly sublime magnanimity enters into the feelings of those w was impossible, that he was dull as a Lincoln: the last sitting—on the day of Lee's surrender on April 9, 1865, the very day of the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, Lincoln, for the last time, went to the photographer's gallery. As he sits in simple fashion sharpening his pencil, the man of sorrows cannot forget the sensereturned with heavy hearts to be mustered out. Many of them reenlisted, to fight with the armies that captured Petersburg, and to be present at the surrender at Appomattox. Then they could return with those of whom Lowell sang: America ‘sends all her handmaid armies back to spin.’ Not lured by any cheat of birth, But by his clea<
as ever welcomed heroes home! Let me picture to you the footsore Confederate soldier, as buttoning up in his faded gray jacket the parole which was to bear testimony to his children of his fidelity and faith, he turned his face southward from Appomattox in April, 1865. Think of him as ragged, half-starved, heavy-hearted, enfeebled by want and wounds; having fought to exhaustion, he surrenders his gun, wrings the hand of his comrades in silence, and lifting his tearstained and pallid face for s at the race-course, and little could be done to check its course till it reached the Ashley River. may perpetuate itself? Will she withhold, save in strained courtesy, the hand which straight from his soldier's heart Grant offered to Lee at Appomattox? Will she make the vision of a restored and happy people, which gathered above the couch of your dying captain, filling his heart with grace, touching his lips with praise, and glorifying his path to the grave,—will she make this vision on whi