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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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ere invaded by unlawful conspiracies and combinations to destroy their property and disturb their domestic tranquillity, what was more natural than that they should declare, as they acceded to the Union of their own right and free will to secure liberty and the peaceable possession of their property, when this was denied them they had the right of secession? When the war closed we surrendered by capitulation, with arms in our hands. What were the terms of the capitulation with Grant at Appomattox and Sherman in North Carolina? They were that the Confederates should furl their flags, stack their arms, return to their homes and yield obedience to the Constitution and laws of the Union then existing; and it was stipulated on the other side, that they should have the protection of the Constitution and laws of the Union. That the Confederates kept the terms of their capitulation, no one will be heard to deny. The question soon arose as to how the seceded States were to be brought
pi regiments of this brigade were then commanded as follows: Thirteenth, Lieut. W. H. Davis; Seventeenth, Capt. Gwin R. Cherry; Eighteenth, Lieut. John W. Gower; Twenty-first, Lieut. Benjamin George. General Davis' brigade was surrendered at Appomattox, including the Second, Eleventh, Twenty-sixth, and Forty-second regiments. Harris' brigade, Mahone's division, here also ended its gallant career, the regiments being commanded at that time as follows: Twelfth, Capt. A. K. Jones; Sixteenth, Lieut.-Col. James H. Duncan; Nineteenth, Col. Richard W. Phipps; Forty-eighth, Col. Joseph M. Jayne. The remnant of Humphreys' brigade, at its surrender at Appomattox under Captain Cherry, numbered 20 officers and 231 men; Davis' brigade had 21 officers and 54 men; and Harris' brigade had 33 officers and 339 men. Meanwhile the Mississippi infantry of the armies of Tennessee and Mississippi had joined the forces under Gen. J. E. Johnston for the defense of the Carolinas. Loring's division was
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
paralleling at Chickamauga and Knoxville its heroic deeds in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Through all the unequaled hardships and dangers of the Overland campaign and of that around Richmond and Petersburg until the final end of all at Appomattox, Humphreys and his gallant men remained faithful, and, when the final catastrophe came, returned to their homes with the consciousness of duty well performed. When President Andrew Johnson was carrying out his reconstruction plan, General Humpwas mustered into the Confederate service at Lynchburg and assigned to the Third brigade of the army of the Shenandoah. This brigade was commanded by Gen. Barnard E. Bee, and did valiant fighting at First Manassas. From that day to the end at Appomattox, the Eleventh Mississippi followed the fortunes of the army of Northern Virginia, except that Company K was, at the reorganization, transferred to the Western army and formed part of the Forty-first Mississippi regiment. Of this regiment Tucke