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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
cavalry. I cannot close this, my last official report, without commending for their valuable services the following officers of my staff not previously mentioned, and who at the last moment were found doing their duty on the fated field of Appomattox: Majors Mason and Treaner, Assistant Adjutant and Inspector-Generals; Major W. B. Warwick, Chief Commissary; Dr. A. C. Randolph, Chief Surgeon; Major Breathed, Chief of Artillery; Major G. M. Ryalls, formerly of General Stuart's staff; and Capts not immediately pertaining to his office. I deeply regret being obliged to mention the dangerous wounding of my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Charles Minnigerode, Jr. One of the last minie-balls that whistled on its cruel errand over the field of Appomattox passed entirely through the upper part of his body. He fell at my side, where for three long years he had discharged his duties with an affectionate fidelity never exceeded, a courage never surpassed. Wonderfully passing unharmed through the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's bummers, and some of their work. (search)
tistical must be the first letter to a friend, after an interval of months, since a parting such as ours at ill-starred Appomattox. I forgot to say that I have not yet taken the oath, but, of course, will do so eventually. If I live in this counbeen, it certainly was not a Rebellion. Yours, very respectfully, Edward L. Wells. the historic apple tree at Appomattox has been so often shown to be a myth that we have been both surprised and amused at seeing the story recently revived iat the surrender was consummated at some other place, but the negotiations certainly took place under the apple tree at Appomattox, and there is no myth about this celebrated tree. Now, the gentleman referred to was simply mistaken in his facts. ther apple trees in the orchard. It is also true that hungry Rebs. in Richmond sold to Northern relic-hunters tons of Appomattox apple tree. But this does not redeem the story, or make the surrender, or any negotiations concerning it, to have occu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations in front of Petersburg June 24th, 1864. (search)
Operations in front of Petersburg June 24th, 1864. Report of General Hagood. headquarters Hagood's S. C. Brigade, Hoke's division, June 26th, 1864. Capt. Otey, A. A. G.: Captain,—I am required to make a full report of the operations of my command in front of Petersburg on the morning of the 24th inst.: My Brigade occupied the left of our line of entrenchments, resting on the south bank of the Appomattox, the Twenty-seventh, Twenty-first and Eleventh Regiments filling the space from the river to the City Point road, and the Twenty-fifth and Seventh battalions extending along the lines south of the road. The enemy's entrenchments were at this point, parallel to ours, at a distance of about four hundred yards—an open field, with a rank growth of oats upon it, intervening. Each side had slight rifle-pits a short distance in advance of its first line of entrenchments. Our line of entrenchments was single. The enemy was entrenched in three lines close together, and the