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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
his wound was mortal, he answered, I am no more afraid to die than I was afraid to do my duty. They were splendid specimens of a noble race-a race whose achievements astonished the world and wrung from the foe himself a full measure of praise. During the terrible six days which followed the retreat of our army from Richmond, the medical men, by their unswerving devotion to duty and cheerful support, contributed no little to inspire the heroism which turned our defeat into honor, and made Appomattox one of the proudest memories of the war. The social condition of the South, while it offered unusual and rare advantages to her sons generally, denied to the medical men, save in exceptional instances, the opportunities which were conducive to the progress and development of medicine. This peculiar Society gave to them, however, boldness of thought, independence in investigation, and they possessed the courage of their convictions; they thought well and they thought clearly; they fough
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
. Bursting into flame in the border war of Kansas, and finally sweeping the country like a besom in 1861 to 1865; it ended only when Lee laid down his arms at Appomattox. I have said that Massachusetts was the mother of secession—nor need she or any other State be ashamed to own its maternity. Its exercise has produced two organization or discipline in the Army of Northern Virginia needs no other answer than a reading of the roll of battles fought on Virginia soil, from Bull Run to Appomattox. * * * Lee led his ill-supplied army from victory to victory, year after year, beating back with terrible losses the wonderfully organized, perfectly equipped, ent, was never greater in all his eventful career than when, with the destinies of the two armies in his hands, he reconstructed the Union by the terms given at Appomattox. A reconstruction which, if allowed to stand, would have quickly healed the wounds of war, and left no bloody chasm to be bridged by the devilish devices of pe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Life, services and character of Jefferson Davis. (search)
that it was fought to the finish without compromise either tendered or entertained. The fact that it was so fought out gave finality to its result and well-nigh extinguished its embers with its flames. No drop of blood between Petersburg and Appomattox—not one in the last charge—was shed in vain. Peace with honor must pay its price, even if that price be life itself, and it is because the South paid that price with no miser's hand that her surviving soldiers carried home with them the consci When burst the sulphurous storm, the undaunted hero dropped the visor of his helmet and stood there to die. Would you know why the South is great? Look on the new-made grave in Louisiana, and consider the ragged soldier of Bentonville and Appomattox. Early days—Davis and Lincoln. After the Revolutionary war Samuel Davis, who had served in it as one of the mounted men of Georgia, settled in Kentucky. Pending the war, in 1782 (the very year that George Rogers Clarke captured Kaskaskia<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
a sufficient recompense for any service. The dignity and grandeur of General Lee never appeared to greater advantage than on the occasion of the surrender at Appomattox. Others have described better than I can his appearance in the interview with General Grant. Let me say, however, as the only Confederate witness of that scenit had been the way of triumph. Grant's tribute to Lee. Perhaps the highest tribute that was ever paid to General Lee was paid by General Grant himself at Appomattox. After the meeting at McLean's house, where the terms of surrender were agreed upon, General Grant requested another interview with General Lee. Upon his States from the evil effects of a continuance of such a form of government in any part of the country. A Grand sentiment from Lee. After the surrender at Appomattox, and the cessation of hostilities, there was more or less doubt among those who had been in the army as to what they should do. Some, unable to reconcile thems
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
s when, in camp and field, they had suffered the pangs of hunger and thirst; days when, by overwhelming numbers, they had been forced to yield; the day when, at Appomattox, drawn up in line, they presented an appearance far from that they had made when they had marched forth in 1861; days of strife and misery; days of joy and gladrness had not lodgment. Amidst crowding images and incidents, patriotism and charity were brightly present. The fiat of the sword was unreservedly accepted at Appomattox. The South holds the common interest of our reunited country in its due regard. It earnestly invokes respectful consideration and fraternity. It was a clouth letters of regret from the absent. In the spring of 1861, full of hope, they went into service. All through the fiery ordeal they bore their part, and when Appomattox came they were there with thinned ranks but with brave hearts. Chaplain P. C. Robert came all the way from St. Louis to share the joys of the occasion. Th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Testimonials from visiting soldiers. (search)
many of those Virginia homes were in ashes; when the few which were spared sheltered those to whom little was left save honor, and when our guns were buried at Appomattox, and our tattered banners were reverently furled, we left Virginia with heavy hearts, sorrowing mostly for the people we were leaving in sore distress—a people ond. Things have changed, however. We have yearned for Virginia and Richmond many years, and on to Richmond is again the watchword. The old flag we furled at Appomattox is again unfurled to the breeze, the bands are playing Carry Me Back to Old Virginia, and we are again marching between long lines of friends—there are some teas of our war, after the roar of their guns had been heard on every battlefield in Virginia, then only was their tattered, torn and bloodstained banner furled at Appomattox. But the scene changes. After a lapse of twenty-five years the march to Old Virginia is resumed. The old veterans of many a campaign are now accompanied by a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters of R. E. Lee. (search)
ence, nor can they be concentrated for the want of it. * * * The cavalry and artillery of the army are still scattered for want of provender, and our supply and ammunition trains, which ought to be with the army in case of a sudden movement, are absent collecting provisions and forage — some in West Virginia and some in North Carolina. You see to what straits we are reduced. headquarters Petersburg, March 17, 1865. Honorable John C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: * * * * * * * I have had this morning to send General William H. F. Lee's division back to Stony Creek, whence I called it in the last few days, because I cannot provide it with forage. I regret to have to report these difficulties, but think you ought to be apprised of them in order, if there is any remedy, it should be applied. There being no remedy Appomattox came, where General Lee said: Then there is nothing left me but to go and see General Grant, and I would rather die a thousands deaths. R. S. Thomas
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Birthday: eminent men of the United States send sentiments for the day—ministers, soldiers, statesmen and scholars each bring an offering. (search)
Southern people, and hence to the whole country. J. M. Schofield. Washington, D. C. Admiral Porter, of the Navy. No man should hesitate to bear testimony to the reputation of General Robert E. Lee as one of the greatest soldiers of the civil war. But for his generalship the Southern Confederacy would no doubt have sooner broken up, and he kept his army together under circumstances that would have appalled almost any other leader. General Lee accepted the situation after Appomattox in the true spirit which characterized all his actions, and I feel sure that when he died he had the respect of every Northern soldier and sailor, to say nothing of the thousands of citizens who admired his private character. David D. Porter, Admiral. Washington, D. C. Gov. Campbell, of Ohio. As a Northern man, and a member of that wing of the Democratic party which readily conceded anything to prevent war, yet cheerfully risked everything to preserve the Union after war had co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee as an educator. (search)
andidacy would be injurious to Virginia. I showed Lee's letter to Judge Robert Ould, excommissioner of exchange, and then my associate in the Senate. He immediately took from his desk a letter, recently received from Lee, in reply to an inquiry from him identical with mine and handed it to me. From its perusal I found he based his refusal to Ould on the same ground he did to me. A gentleman—at whose house, in Powhatan county, Va., General Lee stopped while returning from the surrender in Appomattox—told me Lee said to him that many would wonder why he did not make his escape before the surrender, when it was practicable, and gave as a reason why he did not that he was unwilling to separate his fate from men who had fought under him so long. When I recall my old commander, I think not in connection with him of ambitious Caesar, of avaricious Marlborough, of selfish Bonaparte, but rather of the English Hampden and the American Washington, who resembled him in his rare moderation and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
people at large to commemorate the deeds of Confederate valor. Many of our citizen soldiers were wounded on that eventful day, and many were taken prisoners and carried away to Northern prisons, where they were confined for months. Among these were Honorable Anthony M. Keiley, who, while in prison, wrote most of his book entitled In Vinculis. Mr. Robert A. Martin was among the wounded, and Doctor W. E. Harwood lost an arm. Historical. Hardly more than a year after the surrender at Appomattox, when the graves of Confederates around Petersburg were scattered in farmyard and in field, on hill-top and in ravine, while the Federal troops were encamped at the Fair-Grounds and there was no pretence or form of civil government, the Ladies' Memorial Association was organized. The First organization. Some time in May, 1866, a call for a meeting was published in the local press, and there was a hearty response. The Virginia women who then assembled determined to unite in a permane
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