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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of Company D. First regiment Virginia Cavalry, C. S. A. (search)
hn G. White, acting orderly sergeant in the absence of P. C. Landrum, who held that office at the close of the war. This was the first rollcall since the day of Appomattox. The following is the roll as called, and it is believed to be reasonably accurate, and contains a statement of the men killed and those wounded, those who dsuccessful or forced from the field by sheer numbers we compelled the praise of friends and foes, and in the last act of the bloody drama led the last charge at Appomattox. It was my duty to act as orderly sergeant in the terrible campaign of ‘64. It opened on the 5th day of May. On that morning I reported one captain, two lir, and I assure you that the survivors of our old company will be gratified to have you come, and as one of them, answer to the first roll call since the day of Appomattox. Respectfully and truly yours, R. M. page. A detail of eight men was then sent to escort the old battle flag of the regiment from its repository to the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
an account of the transactions of my receiving the first demand for the surrender of General Lee's army before reaching Appomattox. I remember having written to you last year that I would write it for your use as a matter of history. I did it in pethe surrender of his devoted army. In an hour's time we were silently pursuing our way toward the now famous field of Appomattox. We marched all day of the 8th of April, and slept in bivouac not more than three or four miles from Appomattox, whereAppomattox, where the demand was made again, and was acceded to, and the Confederacy of the South went down in defeat, but with glory. We arrived on the field of Appomattox about 9 o'clock on the 9th day of April, the day of capitulation. The negotiations lasted Appomattox about 9 o'clock on the 9th day of April, the day of capitulation. The negotiations lasted during that day. The general order from General Lee was read to the army on the 10th of April. This is as I remember it. General Lee published his last order to his soldiers on that day. I sat down and copied it on a piece of Confederate paper, u
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
. And it was of such as these that the artillerists of the Army of Northern Virginia was composed. As they served their guns in war, so they served their country in war and in peace, and deserve well of their countrymen and countrywomen. God bless them always. But the end of the war came, and with that end came the beginning of sacrifices and sorrows, as well as the greatest services to their country, of the artillerists of the Army of Northern Virginia. When on the fated field of Appomattox these old soldiers grounded their trusted and well worn arms, to what did they return? Not to the homes of peace and plenty they had enlisted from four years before, but to devastation, desolation, ruin and almost to despair. Where my home was glad, were ashes, For horror and shame had been there. We had seen from the smoking village The mothers and daughters fly, We had seen where the little children Sank down in the furrows to die; From the far off conquered cities Came the voice of s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of William L. Saunders, Ll.D. (search)
n, when I remember how the old State bared her bosom to the mighty storm, how she sent her sons to the field until both the cradle and the grave were robbed of their just rights; how devotedly those sons stood before shot and shell and the deadly bullet, so that their bones whitened every battle-field; when I remember how heroically she endured every privation until starvation was at her very doors, and until raiment was as scarce as food, and with what fortitude she met defeat when, after Appomattox, all seemed lost save honor; especially when I remember how, in the darkest of all hours, rallying once more to the struggle for constitutional government, she enlisted for the war of Reconstruction, fought it out to the end, finally wresting glorious victory from the very jaws of disastrous defeat, I bow my head in gratitude and say, as our great Confederate commander, the immortal Lee, said, when watching the brilliant fight some of our regiments were making at a critical time in one of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
rinciples were uttered seems to be destined to become. Now we know that the cause for which we fought, in a sense, is a lost cause. The formation of a separate Confederacy, bounded by the geographical boundaries of those States which attempted to establish it, has forever passed away. It would now be an anomaly; it would not receive the support of those who survive that war—the causes which made that geographical boundary important having passed away. When the surrender took place at Appomattox—when the greatest of modern soldiers laid down the noblest of modern swords—the hope of the South for a separate independence was forever ended. How far the matters involved in that controversy passed away in that surrender may become a matter of dispute. What loss was involved in it, what was the permanent element therein, are matters to which we may revert for discussion. All of us will admit that the problem of African slavery changed its form as a result of that war. The equality <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
mpressed the children of those who sustained the Lost Cause as though the history of their ancestors would not bear criticism. These children have heard nothing but the songs of the victors, and it is due them that they should have the facts of history as presented by the official records, to prove to them that though the children of the vanquished, yet they are descended from heroes. We say to the victors, Raise your Arc de Triomphe and write in letters of gold, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, Appomattox, and our children will pass with uncovered heads under its shining arch; but let them, as they look up through their tears at the obverse side of this arch, see written, Federal enlistments, 2,778,304; Confederate enlistments, 600,000, and this is all they ask. It is the truth which makes a man free. In this article we have spoken unstintingly of the gallantry of the Federals on many hard-fought fields, and have not spoken, except incidentally, of the bravery and endurance of the Confe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the monument to the Richmond Howitzers (search)
it of the men whose guns had been heard upon every battlefield from Bethel to Appomattox, nor those who had stood shoulder to shoulder with the heroic Howitzers. T the age of manhood. It is of these boys and their heroism, from Bethel to Appomattox, that our distinguished orator will speak to you this afternoon, and while on the first clench of that long death grip which lasted from the Wilderness to Appomattox that as John Thompson Brown rode to the front of his batteries to secure an ahe surrender of all for duty—was preached by their detachments from Bethel to Appomattox and from Manassas to Manassas—and then at the last, the highest, the bravest rs the desolating tempest until it was their glory to stand with the 7,000 of Appomattox. Obedient to their great captain to the last, at his word, and only at his w of a Confederate battle-flag, and is encircled by the legend: From Bethel to Appomattox. These medallions were modelled entired by Mr. William L. Sheppard, forme
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The private Infantryman. (search)
in the summer of 1864, but his allegiance to the army, his duty to himself and his family bade him go almost daily to a hopeless slaughter, and often he marched to battle for his personal honor, without the slightest hope for his country's independence. Can you imagine heroism more sublime than the private infantryman's who held the front lines of the Confederacy during the last half of 1864 and the winter and spring of 1865? Around Petersburg along the disastrous line of retreat to Appomattox, and even there he shouldered his musket and yielded ready obedience to the order for a charge, until his matchless commander said his duty to his country had been faithfully performed, and further resistance would be a useless sacrifice. He had enlisted as a private, he fought as a private, he surrendered as a private, and then he returned to private life to battle for bread. His country was lost, but a dauntless spirit directed him in the evolution to another citizenship. He guided
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
de equal to the best of the regular troops, and became as well known throughout the Army of Northern Virginia as its first loved commander. Of this regiment General Lee said: It is a splendid body of men. General Ewell said: It is the only regiment in my command that never fails. General Jeb Stuart said: It always does exactly what I tell it. And General Early said: They can do more hard fighting and be in better plight afterwards than any troops I ever saw. From Harper's Ferry to Appomattox this splendid body of men carried the battle-flag of their regiment into every battle fought by Lee and Jackson, and never failed. To the last, the remnant of the regiment was as undaunted, as unwavering, and as ready to respond to the order to charge as at the beginning, and when at the surrender they stacked arms in front of a division of the Federal army, and set their faces homeward, they marched off with the swinging gait of Jackson's foot cavalry, cheering for Jefferson Davis and fo