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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
er, growing out of the campaign has been over the conduct of General Longstreet on the second and third days of the battle, and his alleged tardiness and failure to co-operate cordially with the Commander-in-Chief. In his book From Manassas to Appomattox, and in various publications given to the press, General Longstreet has vigorously defended himself, and adopting the old Roman method has sought to carry the war into Africa, and made counter charges, sometimes with an exhibition of temper whil Longstreet's official report he makes a similar statement: That on the night of the 28th, one of the scouts came in with the information, that the enemy had passed the Potomac, and was probably in pursuit of us, and his book, From Manassas to Appomattox, the scout is described as one who had been employed by him, and that he brought the additional intelligence of Meade's assignment to the command of the Federal army. Colonel Mosby has pointed out the extreme improbability, or as he thinks imp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
ring to the Fifteenth Regiment, Senator Freelinghuysen said: It was recruited from five of the northern counties—Rundeston, Sussex, Somersex, Warren and Morris. They came from plow and workshop, from desk and pulpit, the flower of mankind, eager at their country's call. With banners flying they marched peacefully away from Flemington, N. J., most of them never to return, but all destined to engage in a conflict unparalleled in the annals of war. They fought from Fredericksburg to Appomattox: in more than twenty-four conflicts, such well known battles as Gettysburg, Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. It was on this battlefield—Spotsylvania—however, that they accomplished a crowning achievement by passing the enemy's line and holding a most strategical position. This enemy did not yield before it had exhausted half of the regiment. So desperate did both sides fight that their deeds of valor will be remembered as long as the war itself, and after this monument sha<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of battle of five Forks. (search)
extended; by Ord, with the Army of the James, between him and Humphreys, and by Humphreys, upon the intrenchments about Burgess' Mill, whilst Sheridan, with the cavalry and the Fifth Corps, was to sweep around and clear out everything to the Appomattox River. Longstreet, not having found out that the Army of the James had been withdrawn from his front, though it had been withdrawn on the evening of March 27th, the seventh day before, remained on the Richmond and Bermuda lines, under the impre the river it was struck in flank and rear at Sailor's Creek, where the trains were blocked at the ford, and the rear part of the army halted to protect them; and nearly half the army was broken up and the greater part of it captured. Lee at Appomattox—surrender. On the 8th, General Lee, with the remainder of the army, resumed his march towards Lynchburg and reached Appomattox Courthouse; but during the evening of that day Sheridan, supported by Ord, cut across his line of march just beyon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's last camp. (search)
General Lee's last camp. Buckingham, Va., Dec. 27, 1901. When the Confederate forces on the 8th day of April, 1865, were retreating and the Federal forces pressing hard in pursuit from Amelia Courthouse to Appomattox, a piece of ordnance, which it became necessary to abandon in order to hasten their progress, was left by the Confederates concealed in a bottom off from the public road not far from Curdsville, and remained there for a time after the war. A rear guard was left to cover the line of retreat taken by the Confederates, and when this guard reached the old McKinney place (where Governor Mc-Kinney was born and raised), one of the Confederate soldiers slipped off his boots and climbed a large oak tree (which stands now at this point covered with mistletoe), to reconnoitre, when a bullet from a Federal gun cut off a twig just above his head and he came down and went; nor did he stand on the order of his going, but went at once, dropping from the limb of the tree astri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Munford's Marylanders never surrendered to foe. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. (search)
Munford's Marylanders never surrendered to foe. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. Belonged to famous command which cut its way out on Eve of Lee's surrender. By John R. Stonebraker. After repulsing the Yankees when we made the last charge at Appomattox, and General Munford, having most emphatically declined to be included in the surrender of General R. E. Lee's army, General Munford's command moved off slowly and unmolested, reaching Lynchburg that afternoon. The First Maryland Cavalry crossed the James River about dark and encamped in the Fair Grounds. At sunrise the next morning, April 10, we were formed in line, and Colonel Dorsey informed us that it had been determined at yesterday's conference to disband the cavalry for a short time. Acting upon this agreement, we were free to go where we pleased until April 25, when he would expect every man to meet him at the Cattle Scales, in Augusta county. We at once broke ranks; our color-bearer, John Ridge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
easoned veterans, I should have been and am content to let history and posterity take care of the facts. I regret to have written at such length, especially as I have been so often disgusted with many magazine writers, who being invisible in war and invincible in peace, yet now know all about it, and from a perversion of facts draw false conclusions with a facile pen. And I have time and again promised myself not to talk or write anything more about the War between the States, but as no doubt Noah and his sons being saved in the Ark from the vortex of water talked about the flood for the next hundred years, so I think it likely those who participated in the War of the Confederacy and were saved from the crucible of fire through which the Army of Northern Virginia passed from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, and from the Rapidan to Appomattox, will be apt to talk about it as long as life lasts, and chronologically reckon everything from that era. Yours very sincerely, B. L. Farinholt.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
lower of our land died; and to the principles of self-government, self-defense, selfrespect and loyalty to our traditions for which we have contended ever since Appomattox. By the good hand of God the past has made the present, we must see to it that the future shall be worthy of the past and the present. It is too late to be tle was hopeless, we could not expect to have a united country. And therefore, from the time he began in Belmont until he accomplished the surrender of Lee, at Appomattox, he fought not cities, not points of strategy, but he fought the enemy, and he fought, and fought, and fought, until he wore out the opposition, because only ber foot; stacks of straw and hay lighting up the darkness of night! The result was 9,000 ragged, starving heroes, eating parched corn, march from Richmond to Appomattox. And the surrender of Lee is accomplished! This was the very genius of war that suppressed the rebellion. Yes, they fought, and fought, and fought, till they