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ave our men proved themselves superior to the foe — the artillery have amused themselves greatly, and practiced with much accuracy and effect upon the numerous breast, field, and born works thrown up on the Federal front. Since Capt. Dabney's efforts on Friday last, with heavy pieces, which caused a indecorous stampede from Federate artillery and infantry camps it was surmised that their obnoxious presence would no longer disgrace the lovely face of the landscape on the north bank of the Chickahominy yet, numerous and impudent as ever, they again appeared in working parties on Saturday and Monday, presenting fair scope and practice for some artillerists, who, moving deliberately to the front, near Garnett's farm, shelled the enemy from their excavations, and expedited their departure from the knolls and woods with much effect. Shell from our pieces could be plainly seen bursting among the enemy, and although they bravely withstood our for some short time, expecting the arrival of U.
f the conflict. This statement agrees with all we have heard from other quarters. We have examined many persons — officers and men — with regard to the matter, and they all say the Yankees made no bayonet charge, either at Williamsburg or at Chickahominy. Indeed, they all asseverate the direct reverse. They say that our men repeatedly charged, and that in no instance did the Yankees stand long enough to receive the shock. McClellan's statement, on his official dispatch with regard to a charge made upon Early's brigade at Williamsburg, was so notoriously false that General Early felt himself constrained to give it the lie direct, under his own hand, in the newspapers. His statements about Yankee charges at Chickahominy are given the lie just as direct by every General on the field. But it is not wonderful. A man who can descend to lie as he did about that battle in other respects, will descend to anything. McClellan evidently wishes to stimulate his men to the bayonet trial
The enemy's loss at Chickahominy. The truth with regard to the loss of the Yankees at Chickahominy begins to come out, in spite of all McClellan's attempts to suppress it. At first it was stated, roughly, at 3,000 men killed, wounded and missing. We knew that was an under estimate, for intelligence received from within their lines made it, by their own confession, amount to at least 4,000 in wounded. Next came the statement of the New York Herald, which gave 800 killed and 4,000 wounded,Chickahominy begins to come out, in spite of all McClellan's attempts to suppress it. At first it was stated, roughly, at 3,000 men killed, wounded and missing. We knew that was an under estimate, for intelligence received from within their lines made it, by their own confession, amount to at least 4,000 in wounded. Next came the statement of the New York Herald, which gave 800 killed and 4,000 wounded, besides a number of missing.--Knowing the Yankee propensity to lie, we then expressed our conviction that they had lost at least ten thousand men. In the meantime out came McClellan's report, in which, after claiming a great victory, he acknowledged a loss of 5,724. Week before last, a lady arrived in this city from beyond the enemy's lines, who had heard their officers say, in the cars, that they were badly beaten, and that their loss was at least 10,000. Now, the correspondent of the New Yo