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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
(April 19, 1775), Cambridge became the Headquarters of the troops for the siege of Boston, then held by the British. The students were ordered to leave the buildings, which were turned into barracks. The institution was temporarily removed to Concord. Washington arrived, July 2; and on the next day took command of the patriot army under the ancient elm which still attracts many a pilgrim. Sumner did not follow his teachers to Concord, but, in May, joined the army at Cambridge, with the ranConcord, but, in May, joined the army at Cambridge, with the rank of an ensign. He had already acquired some knowledge of the drill in a college company, called the Marti-Mercurian Band, which existed in the years 1770-87, Reminiscences of the Old College Company, or Marti-Mercurian Band, in Columbian Centinel, Boston, April 2, 1828, by Charles Pinckney Sumner. References to this company and its uniform may be found in The Harvard Book. Vol. I pp. 42, 67. and was afterwards revived as the Harvard Washington Corps. The good soldier, though his text-bo
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
ect the least inaccuracy. I recollect accompanying him to an ecclesiastical council (ex parte), held in the old court-house in Cambridge, and convened for the purpose of dismissing the Rev. Dr. Holmes. Mr. Samuel Hoar, a distinguished lawyer of Concord, was counsel for the party opposed to Dr. Holmes. Never having heard him in a set speech, Sumner and myself went for the purpose of hearing his plea, in which he quoted the familiar verse, Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis. But, instend in high spirits, and walked on singing and laughing, and attracting considerable attention. Refreshing themselves in the early evening, at Lincoln, with a hearty supper of brown-bread and milk, they passed their first night at a small inn in Concord. Rising before four the next morning (15th), they went through Sudbury, Stow, and Bolton, and lodged that night at Sterling, enduring severe heat during the day. From Sterling, which they left before five A. M. (16th), they walked up the steep