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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Edisto (South Carolina, United States) or search for Edisto (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
clearly the duty of his successor to go to work as soon as possible and compel the enemy to obedience if he could. But it must be remembered that the Department, in view of the difficulties that had beset the first expedition, had modified its opinion, and was now satisfied that it would be better to have a combined attack of the Army and Navy against the heavy works in Charleston harbor than to depend on the Monitors alone. The New Ironsides was off Charleston bar, two Monitors were at Edisto, one at Stono River, three at Port-Royal, and one at Ossabaw. General Gillmore having arrived. arrangements were immediately made between him and Rear-Admiral Dahlgren for a descent on Morris Island, where the former was to establish his batteries. The naval part of the operations consisted in assembling all the Monitors at Charleston, so as to cross the bar at early daylight, and be ready to cover the landing of the army, with its guns, munitions, etc.; and then to co-operate in whatev
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
be reached. The Tuscarora, Mingoe, State of Georgia and Nipsic were stationed at Georgetown, S. C., to prevent the enemy from erecting batteries at that point, and the Pontiac was in the Savannah, advancing with General Sherman's extreme left. Nearly all the Monitors of the squadron were collected at Charleston. On the 24th of January, 1865, General Sherman marched on Pocotaligo and the Coosawatchee, and the next day made a demonstration on Salkahatchee, while the gun-boats went up the Edisto and Stono Rivers to ascertain whether the enemy intended to hold Charleston or retreat to Columbia. It would require General Slocum at least five days to get his troops clear of the swamps near Savannah, and in the meantime General Howard was, apparently, moving directly on Charleston, although with no intention of going beyond Salkahatchee. The enemy had still a considerable force near Savannah, and his cavalry, under General Wheeler, was exceedingly active in watching the movements of