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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 29 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 6 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) or search for Elizabeth (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
sh what her inventor claimed for her. In fact Worden was somewhat doubtful whether he should ever again set foot on land, for his vessel was almost inundated and leaking apparently enough to sink her. In the meantime the Merrimac, alias Virginia, was all ready to leave the Norfolk Navy Yard on what was said to be her trial trip, and up to the last moment she was filled with mechanics working to complete her. On the 8th of March, 1862, the iron-clad got under way and proceeded down Elizabeth River. cheered by hundreds of people who crowded the banks, and as she passed Map showing Fortress Monroe, Newport news, Chesapeake Bay, James River, and surrounding country. Craney Island and through the obstructions, the ramparts of the fort were lined with soldiers who shouted success to her until their throats were hoarse. Thus the Merrimac started off with all the glamor of success, for there was no one on board who doubted that she could destroy the fleet then lying in the road
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
itself in the way of those who are determined to pursue and overtake it in spite of all obstacles. The proof of this was demonstrated in the case of Lieutenants Lamson and Cushing, two daring young fellows, who lost no opportunity of bringing their names before the Navy Department, and who were as well known in the Navy as the most successful commanders of fleets. A great many of the vessels of the North Atlantic squadron were employed in the blockade of the coast from the mouth of the Chesapeake to below Cape Fear shoals. The Cape Fear River had (since the complete blockade of Charleston) become the principal ground for blockade-runners, that river having two entrances, by either of which blockade-runners could enter, protected by Fort Caswell on the south side of Cape Fear, and by strong earth-works (which finally grew to be Fort Fisher) on the north side. Many reports are made of the capture or destruction of blockade-runners, and in chasing up these vessels great activity w