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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Escambia (Florida, United States) or search for Escambia (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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ocked, and the roadstead very capacious. There are excellent positions within for repairing, building and launching vessels, and for docks and dock-yards in healthy situations. The supply of good water is abundant. These properties, in connection with the position of the harbor, as regards the coast, have induced the government to select it as a Naval station, and a place of rendezvous and repair. The upper arms of Pensacola bay receive the Yellow Water or Pea river, Middle river and Escambia river, eleven miles from the Gulf. Santa Rosa Island. Santa Rosa Island is situated east by northwest by south fourteen leagues, and completely shuts out Pensacola from the sea. It is so low that the sea in a gale washes its top. It is not more than one-fourth of a mile wide.--The west point of this island is at the mouth of Pensacola bay. The latter is not over one and a quarter mile wide. Fort Pickens. The principal means of defence to the mouth of Pensacola bay and the nav