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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 52 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 22 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 16 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson). You can also browse the collection for Euphrates or search for Euphrates in all documents.

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Epictetus, Discourses (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson), book 3 (search)
comes familiar. For you have never entered upon anything considerately, nor after having surveyed and tested the whole matter; but carelessly, and with a half-way zeal. Thus some, when they have seen a philosopher, and heard a man speaking like Euphrates,Euphrates was a philosopher of Syria, whose character is described, with the highest encomiums, by Pliny. See L. I. Ep.x.-C.--though indeed who can speak like him?- have a mind to be philosophers too. Consider first, man, what the matter is, anEuphrates was a philosopher of Syria, whose character is described, with the highest encomiums, by Pliny. See L. I. Ep.x.-C.--though indeed who can speak like him?- have a mind to be philosophers too. Consider first, man, what the matter is, and what your own nature is able to bear. If you would be a wrestler, consider your shoulders, your back, your thighs; for different persons are made for different things. Do you think that you can act as you do and be a philosopher; that you can eat, drink, be angry, be discontented, as you are now? You must watch, you must labor, you must get the better of certain appetites; must quit your acquaintances, be despised by your servant, be laughed at by those you meet; come off worse than others
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson), book 4 (search)
is, but are misled and confounded by your own carelessness. And, indeed, even those called philosophers enter upon their profession by commonplace beginnings. As soon as they have put on the cloak and let their beards grow, they cry, " I am a philosopher." Yet no one says, " I am a musician," merely because he has bought a fiddle and fiddlestick; nor, "I am a smith," because he is dressed in the cap and apron. But they take their name from their art, not from their garb. For this reason, Euphrates was in the right to say, "I long endeavored to conceal my embracing the philosophic life; and it was of use to me. For, in the first place, I knew that whatever I did right I did not for spectators, but for myself. I ate in a seemly manner, for my own approbation. I preserved composure of look and manner, all for God and myself. Then, as I contended alone, I alone was in danger. Philosophy was in no danger, on my doing anything shameful or unbecoming; nor did I hurt the rest of the world,