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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of fleet Wood. (search)
ssing, which it was contemplated to make the next day. Fitz Lee's Brigade, commanded by Colonel Thomas T. Munford, having charge of the pickets on the upper Rappahannock, was, with the exception of the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, moved across the Hazel river. W. H. F. Lee's Brigade was stationed on the road to Welford's ford; Jones' Brigade on the road to Beverly's ford, and Robertson's Brigade on the farm of John Minor Botts, picketing the lower fords. Hampton's Brigade was held in reserve. One battery of horse artillery was sent with Fitz Lee's Brigade across the Hazel river; the remaining four batteries accompanied Jones' Brigade. The object of the movement contemplated for the next morning was not to make an extensive cavalry raid, but to place the command in such position as best to protect the flank of our army while marching northward. Orders were issued to march at an early hour on the 9th, and, ignorant of any concentration of the enemy's cavalry on the opposite side, the b
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
gstreet's Corps, had established his headquarters at Willis Madden's house. Continuing its march, it crossed the railroad and rejoined Stuart, who, with Jackson's Corps, pursued the enemy to the crossings of the Rappahannock at the railroad bridge and Beverly's ford. Thus were the two armies again confronting each other, but on opposite sides of the river. In this situation General Lee, with the ultimate purpose of forcing an action, marched his army by the left flank, and crossing the Hazel river into what is known as the Little Fork of Culpepper, grouped his whole army on the Upper Rappahannock, opposite the Fauquier Springs. But Stuart's Cavalry, during this movement, had been detached from the army, and crossing the Rappahannock at Waterloo, the first drill-ground of the Black Horse, passed through Warrenton, and attacked, in the rear of Pope's army, Catlett's Station at midnight, thus striking his line of communication with his base of supply. This brilliant exploit resul