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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Holston (Tennessee, United States) or search for Holston (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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ated, and Shackleford moved up to his former position. The enemy's attitude remained threatening, and on the morning of the sixth instant, heavy firing was heard in the direction of Rogersville, a small town situated on the north bank of the Holston River. A detachment of the Third Indiana cavalry was immediately sent out to learn the result, and toward evening sent in a courier with the intelligence that our forces at Rogersville, consisting of the Second Tennessee and Seventh Ohio cavalry, them off by a rapid night march of cavalry upon their front and rear. Brigadier-General Jones, accordingly, was directed to put his brigade in motion, so as to bring himself, on Thursday evening, within a night's march, by the south side of Holston River, down the valley of Buck Creek; while Colonel Giltner, commanding Brigadier-General Williams's brigade, was to move from Kingsport and its vicinity, on the north side of the river. During the afternoon of the fifth Colonel Giltner concentrat
ours. A column of cavalry at the same time ascended the valley to Bristol, driving the enemy across the Virginia line and destroying the railroad bridges over the Holston and Watauga Rivers, so as to prevent the enemy's retreat into Tennessee. The main body of General Burnside's army was now ordered to concentrate on the Tennesseeisoners. The remainder retreated to Loudon, and succeeded in holding the crossing of the river. In the mean time Jones had moved down on the north side of the Holston River, to Rogersville, with some three thousand five hundred cavalry, and surprised our garrison at that place, capturing four pieces of artillery, thirty-six wagonsrters of the army, Washington, D. C., September 11, 1863. I congratulate you on your success. Hold the gap of the North-Carolina mountains, the line of the Holston River, or some point, if there be one, to prevent access from Virginia, and connect with General Rosecrans, at least with your cavalry. General Rosecrans will occ
ting one or the other. Manson's excellent bonhomie has an inspiriting influence on the men; while the serious air and confident ways of Hascall invigorate as a tonic would. The Tennesseeans are under command of our sprightly, gallant Colonel Casement, of the One Hundred and Third. Behind breastworks they may be relied upon. The Colonel has faith, and is confident, vigilant, and industrious. The destinies of our left are in the hands of Casement and his new men. On the south bank of the Holston, Colonel Cameron's brigade has charge of our interests, aided by Wolford's brigade. Altogether, we feel quite confident to look after our own safety until Bragg and Grant have arranged their little affairs. I hope every thing from the results of that. Wednesday, Nov. 25.--Skirmishing in our front very light; it was ascertained that the rebs had crossed in considerable force to the south bank of the river, and threatened to take position on a hill from which they could enfilade our left
re encamped on the eighth of October. December eighth, moved on to Rutledge, county-seat of Grainger County. December ninth, passed through Rutledge and on to Bean's Station. Here our regiment was sent out on the Morristown road to the Holston River. Here we ran upon the rebels; had considerable skirmishing; lost one man. After dark we returned to the station. December tenth, remained at the station. December eleventh, Colonel Pennebaker, with our brigade, went to Morristown. Madfth, the brigade all came back to Blain's Cross-Roads. December twenty-sixth, remained in camp. December twenty-seventh, late in the evening, our brigade moved up the Indian Ridge road to Buffalo Creek, about a mile from Orr's Ferry, on Holston River. December twenty-eighth, sent out a scout, but soon returned; perfectly quiet. December twenty-ninth, moved about a mile, and went into camp, with brigade headquarters, at Esquire West's. Remained here till January ninth, 1864. Janua
mand. He narrowly escaped capture at Cleveland, where three railroad trains fell into our hands. The rebel cavalry returned into Knoxville, arriving on Saturday previous to the famous Sunday assault at Fort Sanders. On the seventeenth of November, Colonel Foster reports that communication was cut off between the army at Knoxville and that portion under General Wilcox, stationed at and near Bull's Gap. On the eighteenth, his division, with General Wilcox's whole command, crossed the Holston River, and camped at Bean Station. The Second cavalry brigade, Colonel Graham, was sent down to Blain's Cross-Roads, to attempt to open communication with Knoxville. He found a heavy force of the enemy's cavalry between that point and Knoxville, and, after some skirmishing, followed General Wilcox's column to Tazewell. From Bean Station, the First cavalry brigade, Colonel Garrard, was despatched to Rogersville, to watch the enemy's forces advancing from Virginia, and protect the rear of G