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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 60 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 48 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 20 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Trinummus: The Three Pieces of Money (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Jupiter (Canada) or search for Jupiter (Canada) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 6 (search)
ervedly. MEGADORUS What's the matter? EUCLIO Do you ask me what's the matter? You who have filled every corner in my house, for wretched me, with thieves? You who have introduced into my dwelling five hundred cooks, with six hands a-piece, of the race of GeryonOf the race of Geryon: Geryon was a King of Spain, slain by Hercures. He was fabled to have had three heads and three bodies, consequently six hands., whom were Argus to watch, who was eyes all over, that Juno once set as a spy upon Jupiter, he never could watch them; a music-girl besides, who could alone drink up for me the Corinthian fountain of PireneFountain of Pirene: Pirene, the daughter of Acheloüs, on Conchreas her son by Neptune being slain by Diana, pined away, and was changed into a fountain, which was in the Arx Corinthiacus, or Citadel of Corinth, and retained her name., if it were flowing with wine? And then as to provisions---- MEGADORUS Troth, there's enough for a procurerFor a procurer: Who might be presumed
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 4, scene 4 (search)
ur own pleasure, and yet you've found nothing of yours in my possession. EUCLIO starting. Stop, stop; who was that? Who was the otherWho was the other: This suspicion in Euclio is very natural; and he asks the question very artfully, for the purpose of catching a confession from him by inadvertence. that was within here, together with yourself? Troth, I'm undone; he's now rummaging about within. If I let this one go, he'll escape. At last, I've now searched this one all over; he has got nothing. Be off where you please; Jupiter and the Gods confound you! STROBILUS He returns his thanks not amissThanks not amiss: He says this sarcastically. If he gets such thanks when he has not stolen the treasure, what would he have got supposing that he had?. EUCLIO I'll go in here now, and I'll at once throttle this accomplice of yours. Will you not fly hence from my sight? Will you away from here, or no? STROBILUS I'm off. EUCLIO Take you care, please, how I see you. (He goes into the Temple.)
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 4, scene 10 (search)
"writ," or "process," by which in action was commenced. against you, unless you make restitution. LYCONIDES Make restitution of what to you? EUCLIO What you've stolen of mine. LYCONIDES I, stolen of yours? Whence, or what is it? EUCLIO So shall Jupiter love you, how ignorant you are about it! LYCONIDES Unless, indeed, you tell me what you are enquiring for. EUCLIO The pot of gold, I say, I'm asking back of you, which you confessed to me that you had taken away. LYCONIDES By my faith, I've neitow who has taken it away, will you discover it to me? LYCONIDES I will do so. EUCLIO Nor accept of a share from him, whoever he is, for yourself, nor harbour the thief? LYCONIDES Even so. EUCLIO What if you deceive me? LYCONIDES Then may great Jupiter do unto me what he pleases. EUCLIO I'm satisfied. Come, then, say what you wish. LYCONIDES If you know me but imperfectly, of what family I'm born: Megadorus here is my uncle; Antimachus was my father; my name is Lyconides; Eunomia is my mother.
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 5, scene 2 (search)
bind me as much as you please. LYCONIDES I will hear you; but hasten the matter very quickly. STROBILUS If you order me to be tortured to death, see what you obtain; in the first place, you have the death of your slave. Then, what you wish for you cannot get. But if you had only allured me by the reward of dear liberty, you would already have obtained your wish. Nature produces all men free, and by nature all desire freedom. Slavery is worse than every evil, than every calamity; and he whom Jupiter hates, him he first makes a slave. LYCONIDES You speak not unwisely STROBILUS Now then hear the rest. Our age has produced masters too grasping, whom I'm in the habit of calling Harpagos, Harpies, and Tantali, poor amid great wealth, and thirsty in the midst of the waters of Ocean; no riches are enough for them, not those of Midas, not of Crœsus; not all the wealth of the Persians can satisfy their Tartarean maw. Masters use their slaves rigorously, and slaves now obey their masters but ta
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 5, scene 3 (search)
o Lyconides, Lyconides makes me a free man, and orders me to be my own master. To LYCONIDES. Do you not promise me so? LYCONIDES I do promise so. STROBILUS Have you heard now what he has said? MEGADORUS We have heard. STROBILUS Swear, then, by Jupiter. LYCONIDES Alas! to what I am reduced by the misfortunes of others! You are too insulting; still, I'll do what he bids me. STROBILUS Hark you, our generation hasn't much confidence in people: the documents are signed; the twelve witnesses are pr registrar writes down the time and the place; and still, the pleader is found to deny that it has been done. LYE. But release me speedily, please. STROBILUS Here, take this stone. Giving him a stone. LYCONIDES If I knowingly deceive you, so may Jupiter reject from me his blessings, the city and citadel safe, as I do this stone. (He throws it. Have I now satisfied you? STROBILUS I am satisfied; and I'm going to bring the gold. LYCONIDES Go with the speed of Pegasus, and return devouring the roa
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 5, scene 5 (search)
LYCONIDES going to the door of EUCLIO'S house. Ho, Eucho, Euclio! MEGADORUS Euclio, Euclio! EUCLIO opening his window. What' the matter? LYCONIDES Come down to us, for the Gods will you to be saved; we've got the pot. EUCLIO Have you got it, or are you trifling with me? LYCONIDES We've got it, I say. Now, if you can, fly down hither. EUCLIO having come out of the house to them. O great Jupiter! O household Divinity and Queen Juno! and Alcides, my treasurer! that at length you do show pity upon a wretched old man. Taking the pot in his arms. O my pot! O how aged I, your friend, do clasp you with joyful arms, and receive you with kisses; with a thousand embraces even I cannot be satisfied. O my hope! my heart! that dissipates my grief. LYCONIDES aside, to MEGADORUS. I always thought that to be in want of gold was the worst thing for both boys and men, and all old people. Indigence compels boys to be guilty of misdeeds, men to thieve, and old men themselves to become beggars. But 'tis