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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 60 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 48 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 20 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Pseudolus, or The Cheat (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Stichus, or The Parasite Rebuffed (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Jupiter (Canada) or search for Jupiter (Canada) in all documents.

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T. Maccius Plautus, Stichus, or The Parasite Rebuffed (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 3 (search)
romises to be lavish in speaking in praise of his entertainer. The diminutive "uncula" suits the measure, and also shows the air of self- satisfaction with which he mentions that which he takes to be of the same harmless nature which some easy casuists among ourselves attribute to what they choose to call white lies. Indeed, the ancients esteemed perjury very much according to the subject on which it was employed. Ovid mentions Mercury as laughing at the perjuries of cheating tradesmen, and Jupiter as smiling at those of lovers; surely, then, "a little bit of a perjury" (the true meaning of "perjeratiuncula") could not be amiss on an occasion so trivial, and yet, to the Parasite, so all-important, as the acquisition of a good dinner.. I'm selling a rusty flesh-scraperA rusty flesh-scraper: The "strigil" was an instrument used by the Greeks and Romans in the place of the flesh-brush of modern times. It was made of bone, iron, copper, and sometimes of silver. It was used after taking t