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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 60 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 48 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 20 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Trinummus: The Three Pieces of Money (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 8 0 Browse Search
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T. Maccius Plautus, Trinummus: The Three Pieces of Money (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 2 (search)
own heart so as not to admit guilt there; suspicion is centred in the heart of another. For if now I should suspect that you had stolen the crown from the head of Jupiter in the CapitolIn the Capitol: Plautus does not much care about anachronism or dramatic precision; though the plot of the play is derived from the Greek, and the expression here employed was proverbial at Rome, to signify a deed of daring and unscrupulous character. From ancient writers we learn that there was a statue of Jupiter seated in a chariot, placed on the roof of the Capitoline Temple. Tarquinius Priscus employed Etrurian artists to make a statue of pottery for this purpose; and tson either has in his mind, or is likely to have; they know what the king whispered in the ear of the queen; they know what Juno talked about in conversation with Jupiter; that which neither is nor is likely to be, do these fellows know. Whether they praise or dispraise any one they please, falsely or truly, they care not a straw,
T. Maccius Plautus, Trinummus: The Three Pieces of Money (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 4 (search)
o you to propose an alliance and bond of friendship between himself and your family. He wishes to take your sister for his wife; and I have the same feelings, and I desire it. LESBONICUS I really don't understand your ways; amid your prosperity you are laughing at my adversity. PHILTO I am a manI am a man: This is somewhat like the celebrated line in Terence: "Homo sum, humani nihil alienum a me puto," "I am a man, nothing that is human do I think unbecoming to me.": you are a man. So may Jupiter love me, I have neither come to laugh at you, nor do I think you deserving of it! But as to what I said, my son begged me to ask for your sister as his wife. LESBONICUS It is right that I should know the state of my own circumstances. My position is not on an equal footing with yours; seek some other alliance for yourselves. STASIMUS to LESBONICUS. Are you really sound in mind or intellect to refuse this proposal? For I perceive that he has been found for you a very friend in needFriend in