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John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 36 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 6 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for Sangamon (Illinois, United States) or search for Sangamon (Illinois, United States) in all documents.

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he had selected was on a bluff overlooking the Sangamon river,--for these early settlers must always be in si death, his subject being the navigation of the Sangamon river. The man, after Abe's speech was through, took man, whose operations extended up and down the Sangamon river for many miles. Having heard glowing reports oe trip to New Orleans. Abe and I came down the Sangamon river in a canoe in March, 1831; landed at what is not neighborhood. In August the waters of the Sangamon river washed Lincoln in to New Salem. This once sprastures. Skirting the base of the bluff is the Sangamon river, which, coming around a sudden bend from the sone bluff and then hugging the other, rolls the Sangamon river. The village of New Salem, which once stood on the news of the coming of a steamboat down the Sangamon river — proof incontestable that the stream was navig and all the other towns along the now interesting Sangamon The final syllable of this name was then pronou
in an important love affair. In a letter dated May 5, 1866, McNamar says: I corrected at his request some of the grammatical errors in his first address to the voters of Sangamon county, his principal hobby being the navigation of the Sangamon river. The circular is dated March 9, 1832, and addressed to the People of Sangamon county. In it he takes up all the leading questions of the day: railroads, river navigation, internal improvements, and usury. He .dwells particularly on the ntire 208 votes in the precinct he received every one save three. It may not be amiss to explain the cause of this remarkable endorsement of Lincoln by the voters in New Salem. It arose chiefly from his advocacy of the improvement of the Sangamon river. He proposed the digging of a canal a few miles east of the point where the Sangamon enters the Illinois river, thereby giving the former two mouths. This, he explained to the farmers, would prevent the accumulation of back-water and conseq
s in such an enterprise, what I now want is that they shall not throw me away just yet. Letter to R. S. Thomas, Virginia, III., Feb. 14, ‘43, Ms. To another friend in the adjoining county of Menard a few days after the meeting of the Whigs in Sangamon, he explains how Baker defeated him. The entire absence of any feeling of bitterness, or what the politicians call revenge, is the most striking feature of the letter. It is truly gratifying, he says, to me to learn that while the people of Sangamon have cast me off, my old friends of Menard, who have known me longest and best, stick to me. It would astonish if not amuse the older citizens to learn that I (a strange, friendless, uneducated, penniless boy, working on a flat-boat at ten dollars per month) have been put down here as the candidate of pride, wealth, and aristocratic family distinction. Yet so, chiefly, it was. There was, too, the strangest combination of church influence against me. Baker is a Campbellite, and theref
fine him as a statesman, as an orator, as an executive of the nation, and as a man. They developed in all the walks of his life; they were his law; they were his nature, they were Abraham Lincoln. This long, bony, sad man floated down the Sangamon river in a frail canoe in the spring of 1831. Like a piece of driftwood he lodged at last, without a history, strange, penniless, and alone. In sight of the capital of Illinois, in the fatigue of daily toil he struggled for the necessaries of life. Thirty years later this same peculiar man left the Sangamon river, backed by friends, by power, by the patriotic prayers of millions of people, to be the ruler of the greatest nation in the world. As the leader of a brave people in their desperate struggle for national existence, Abraham Lincoln will always be an interesting historical character. His strong, honest, sagacious, and noble life will always possess a peculiar charm. Had it not been for his conservative statesmanship, his