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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 68 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 54 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 52 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 26 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 18 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 16 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 12 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 8 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Tiber (Italy) or search for Tiber (Italy) in all documents.

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Polybius, Histories, book 6, Patriotism and Purity At Rome (search)
Patriotism and Purity At Rome The story goes that Horatius Cocles, while fighting Horatius Cocles. with two enemies at the head of the bridge over the Tiber, which is the entrance to the city on the north, seeing a large body of men advancing to support his enemies, and fearing that they would force their way into the city, turned round, and shouted to those behind him to hasten back to the other side and break down the bridge. They obeyed him: and whilst they were breaking the bridge, he remained at his post receiving numerous wounds, and checked the progress of the enemy: his opponents being panic stricken, not so much by his strength as by the audacity with which he held his ground. When the bridge had been broken down, the attack of the enemy was stopped; and Cocles then threw himself into the river with his armour on and deliberately sacrificed his life, because he valued the safety of his country and his own future reputation more highly than his present life, and the years of