hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 68 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 54 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 52 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 26 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 18 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 16 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 12 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 8 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Tiber (Italy) or search for Tiber (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Early Lyric Poetry at Rome. (search)
Early Lyric Poetry at Rome. 1. The beginnings of lyric poetry among the Romans reach back to the prehistoric period of the city, and were as rude and shapeless as was the life of her people. Amid the rough farmer-populace of the turf-walled village by the Tiber the Arval Brethren and the Salii chanted their rude litanies to the rustic deities, - for even then religion was a prime cause in moving men toward poetry. In roughly balanced Saturnian verses men spoke regret and panegyric for the dead and praises for the valorous deeds of the living. The mimetic passion and rude wit of the Roman led him also into boisterous personal satire and into epigram more pungent than polished. But until the last few decades of the Republic these products of the Muse are either anonymous or connected with names well-nigh forgotten, and the
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 55 (search)
e ; Mart. 1.96.1 si non molestum est teque non piget … dicas. tenebrae, lurking-place; cf. Prop. 4.15.17 saepe illam immundis passa est habitare tenebris. campo minore: probably so called to distinguish it from the great campus Martius; and Paulus (Fest. p.131) mentions a campus Martialis on the Caelian, where horse-races were held when the Tiber overflowed the campus Martius (cf. also Ov. Fast. 3.519ff.). This is possibly the place meant, as the search passed from it through the Circus Maximus, by the shops near the Forum (cf. Catul. 37.2n.), over the Capitoline, to Pompey's portico in the Campus Martius. There were yet other campi; cf. Prop. 3.23.6 campo quo movet illa pedes? Not. et Cur. App. I. Campi VIII., etc. On the ablative withou