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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 84 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 54 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 41 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 36 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 36 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. You can also browse the collection for Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) or search for Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 16: second Manassa's. (search)
ame direction, the division of General D. H. Hill bringing up the rear, near the end of the month. Halleck, the new Federal generalissimo, was also eagerly dictating the same movement to McClellan. He found the Grand army divided into two widely separated fragments, and trembled before the activity of Jackson, and the danger of his Capital. McClellan accordingly broke up his camps at Berkeley on the 17th of August, and with sore reluctance shipped the decimated remains of his troops to Aquia Creek on the Potomac. Disease had: been carrying on the work which the sword had begun, And the fever and dysentery of the country had fearfully thinned his ranks. But meantime, General Burnside had brought his corps from North Carolina, and landing it at the same spot on the Potomac, had marched it to the support of General Pope in Culpepper. That commander now had his forces tolerably concentrated along the line of the Orange Railroad. But ignorant of the first principles of strategy
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 18: Fredericksburg. (search)
there ran a railroad of sixty miles' length, direct to Richmond, possessed at least the advantage that it had not yet been signalized by any Federal disaster. Burnside determined to adopt this line, making his base of supplies the landing of Acquia Creek, upon the Potomac, where the Fredericksburg Railroad terminated, thirteen miles north of that town. It was an important recommendation of this route to his jealous masters in Washington, that by pursuing it, he kept that city covered during hations. Of the merits of the quarrel, it is enough to say, that the delay of the bridge trains probably evinced the incompetency both of himself and Halleck. But the interval was diligently improved by him in perfecting his communications at Acquia Creek, fortifying the heights north of the Rappahannock, and arming them with the most potent equipment of heavy guns ever marshalled in the field by any general. The lavish preparations of his government supplied him with an apparatus, compared w