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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 84 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 54 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 41 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 36 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 36 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) or search for Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 5: invasion of Virginia. (search)
services of an army commander of undoubted merit. General Benjamin Huger, another distinguished officer of the army of the United States, who had also resigned, was charged with watching over Norfolk. General John Bankhead Magruder, who had acquired distinction in the Federal army but had joined his fortunes to the South, was ordered to Yorktown to defend the peninsular route. General Holmes, who had rendered conspicuous service in the army of the United States, was sent to command at Acquia Creek, some twelve miles east of Fredericksburg. Robert Garnett, also an officer of the United States Army, of-tested ability, was ordered to West Virginia to take charge of the department and of the forces assembling in that region. All of these officers had been selected with great care, and had been more or less distinguished in the army, but not one of them had ever before been in command of large numbers of men. The regular army of the United States previous to 1861 was a small orga
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
untains on one side, Chesapeake Bay on the other, and divided into three districts: the Valley, to be commanded by T. J. Jackson; the District of the Potomac, under the immediate charge of Beauregard; and that section lying around the mouth of Acquia Creek was placed under the immediate charge of Major-General Holmes. On August 31st the President nominated to the Senate five persons to be generals in the Confederate army: First, Samuel Cooper, from May 15, 1861; second, A. S. Johnston, May 28th following, his report shows 175,854 present for duty, and in March, 1862, 171,602, while the army of his opponent in February had only 47,306 present for duty, including the force under Jackson in the valley and a small number under Holmes at Acquia Creek, and in March about 50,000. It is difficult to conceive why, with these immense odds in his favor, McClellan did not advance in the early spring against Johnston's position. This plan was discussed as well as two or three others. McClell
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
n, who had ever lived-St. Paul and Andrew Jackson; but he took such a fancy to Burnside, when he was a cadet, that he added his name to his toast, and ever thereafter, to the day of his death, he drank to St. Paul, Andrew Jackson, and A. E. Burnside. This officer conceived the idea of concentrating his army on the Rappahannock River opposite Fredericksburg. The position there would be about sixty miles from Richmond, and by a short railroad to his rear he could reach the Potomac near Acquia Creek, and then, by water some fifty miles, his Washington base. He divided his six corps into three grand divisions — the right, composed of the Second and Ninth, under Sumner; the Third and Fifth Corps, the center, under Hooker; and the left, under Franklin, consisting of the First and Sixth. Sumner, in advance, arrived opposite Fredericksburg on November 17th. Franklin was in supporting distance on the 18th, and Hooker on the 19th, but-their pontoons did not arrive for eight days afterwar
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
Index. Acquia Creek, Va., 102, 135. Addison, Joseph, quoted, 171. Alexander, Colonel E. P., mentioned, 231, 253, 292, 293. Amelia Court House, Va., 379, 380, 383. Anderson, Colonel G. T., mentioned, 212. Anderson, General, mentioned, 141, 206, 254; at Gettysburg, 279, 288; succeeds Longstreet, 331; recalled, 352; at Five Forks, 376. Anderson, General, Robert, mentioned, 87. Andrew, Governor John A., mentioned, 145. Antietam, battle of, 208. Appomattox Court House, Va., 386, 387. Arab couplet quoted, 114. Archer's brigade at Gettysburg, 296. Aristo, General, Mariano, 32. Arlington Heights, 108. Arlington House, Va., mentioned, 26, 49, 63, 65, 71, 72, 76, 77, 85, 88, 89, 99, 198, 366. Arlington slaves liberated, 236, 238. Armies of the Confederacy, 326. Armistead, General, Lewis, mentioned, 58, 288; killed at Gettysburg, 296. Army of the James, 387. Army of Northern Virginia, 311, 312, 348, 379, 386. Army of the Potomac, 173, 182, 309,