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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 24 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.20 (search)
to establish a succession of stations for a thousand miles along the Upper Congo, as far as Stanley Falls. Briefly, his route from the ocean covered 110 miles of steaming; then a land march of 235 miles to Stanley Pool, whence the Upper Congo gives clear navigation, for 1070 miles, to Stanley Falls. Numerous tributaries multiply the navigable waterways to about 6000 miles. The district thuserprise, and whatever else failed, this succeeded. The furthest point he then reached was Stanley Falls, where he planted his station in charge of a solitary white man, the plucky little Scotch en Free State. Such were the Scotch engineer, Binnie, who so stoutly held his solitary post at Stanley Falls; the efficient and fine-spirited Danish sailor, Albert Christopherson; the Scandinavian seamaptain D. exceeded his instructions in assuming the responsibility of provoking the Arabs at Stanley Falls. He studied only his own fighting instincts, and British resentment against the slaver. At
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
Good God! How dead? Fever? No, sir, he was shot. By whom? By the Manyuema — Tippu-Tib's people. Good heavens! Well, where is Jameson? At Stanley Falls. What is he doing there, in the name of goodness? He went to obtain more carriers. Well, where are the others? Gone home invalided, some monthsed between Barttelot and myself. The Arab had fed them continually with false hopes of his coming; finally, after seven visits which Barttelot had paid him at Stanley Falls, and in the tenth month, he had brought to Yambuya four hundred men and boy carriers, and a more undisciplined and cantankerous rabble could not have been foun, who, in 1887, had almost made an end of Nelson and Parke. This man he succeeded in securing as guide towards the Congo. Four days march from Kibongi, above Stanley Falls, Emin had the ill-luck to meet Said-bin-Abed, a kinsman of one of the Arabs alleged to have been drowned in the Lake. The Arab turned upon his slave Ismaili,
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.22 (search)
appear at all; and beyond the line of the lakes, and north of the tenth degree of south latitude, the blank of the interior is still as conspicuous, and almost as unrelieved, as it was two-and-twenty years earlier. By 1882, there is a great change. The name of Stanley has begun to be written indelibly upon the surface of the Continent. The vague truncated Congo, or Zaire is the Livingstone River, flowing in its bold horseshoe through the heart of the formerly unexplored region, with Stanley Falls just before the river takes its first great spring westward, and Stanley Pool a thousand miles lower down, where, after a long southerly course, the mighty stream makes its final plunge to the sea. Tributary rivers, hills, lakes, villages, tribal appellations, dot the waste. Uganda is marked, and Urua, and Unyanyembe. If we pass on to the present day, and look at any good recent map, the desert seems to have become — as, indeed, it is — quite populous. There is no stretch of unknown
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
pleased if His Majesty had expressed his determination to economise in other directions, and devote his energies to the railway. The next subject was the suppression of the slave-trade in the Congo. I proposed that troops should be pushed up the Congo, and that posts should be established at the mouths of the Aruwimi and Lumami, and that the garrisons should be increased month by month, until about two thousand troops had been collected, when an onward movement should be made against Stanley Falls, and the Arab power be summarily broken. As this would be a signal of resolute action against all the Arabs above the Falls, about thirty steel boats should be provided, to enable the war to be carried up the Lualaba; for there would be no peace for the State, until every slaver in the Congo State had been extirpated or disarmed. I explained the project in great detail, and urged it vehemently, as after the treachery of Tippu-Tib in the Forest region, it was useless to hope that any
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
Said-bin-Abed, the avenger, had been caught by the Belgian officers at Kirundu (which I know well), was condemned to death, and shot. Thus retribution overtook him, too! Few in this country know that I am the prime cause of this advance of the Belgians against the Arab slave-raiders. Indeed, people little realise how I have practically destroyed this terrible slave-trade, by cutting it down at its very roots. I have also been as fatal to Tippu-Tib, Rashid, his nephew, who captured Stanley Falls from Captain Deane, Tippu-Tib's son, Muini Mubala, and, lastly, Said-bin-Abed,--the son of my old host, Tanganyika, as Abed-bin-Salim was called — as if I had led the avengers myself, which I was very much solicited to do. It has all been part of the policy I chalked out for myself in Africa, and urged repeatedly on the King of the Belgians, at every interview I have had with him, with one paramount object in view,--the destruction of the slave-traffic. At this very time, we have a
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
charges himself with Stanley's future, and gives Stanley his name, 118-125; Stanley travels with, 125; teaches Stanley how to read, 127; gives moral instruction to Stanley, 128-133, 137-139; his religious views, 133-137; the further education he gives Stanley, 140; his adventure with a thief, 141; his last parting with Stanley, 142-144; sends a letter to Stanley, 145, 146; death of, 161. Stanley, Mrs., of New Orleans, 99-101, 111-113. Stanley-Cook exploration in Asia, 223, 224. Stanley Falls, 326. Stanley Pool, 329, 336. Stead, W. T., 455, 456. Story, Newton, 156, 165, 169, 170, 180, 193. Suez Canal, opening of, 245. Swinburne, A. B., 345. Syra, Island of, 230-236. Talbot, A., 456, 458. Tanganyika, Lake, 261, 262, 318, 319. Tanner, Dr., 468, 469, 473-475. Tasmania, Stanley visits, 434, 437, 438. Tay-pay, 475, 476. Taylor, Commissioner, 227. Teheran, 247. Tennant, Dorothy, married to Stanley, 423. See Stanley, Lady. Theodore, King, 229, 230. Tho