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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 38 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Chapultepec (Baja Caifornia Norte, Mexico) or search for Chapultepec (Baja Caifornia Norte, Mexico) in all documents.

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Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, IV. (search)
uch a youth. General Richard Taylor, of the Confederacy, remembers him at this time as a modest, amiable, but by no means promising lieutenant in a marching regiment. But Taylor could scarcely have held this estimate after Molino-del-Rey and Chapultepec. In the months of peace preceding, whether in Louisiana or at Corpus Christi, Grant's thoughts still saw the goal of a professorship; nor was his heart in the Mexican War, when it came. He pronounces it unholy, and he writes: The Southern Reas always in the thick of the action. He was commended in reports, brevetted first lieutenant for distinguished service at Molino-del-Rey (but deaths in that battle brought him full first lieutenancy), and for acquitting himself most nobly at Chapultepec he received the brevet of captain. Yet these honours do not show him so much out of the common as what quietly happened between him and General Worth at San Cosme. He had found a belfry which commanded an important position of the enemy; and