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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). You can also browse the collection for Christian (Kentucky, United States) or search for Christian (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 1, line 1 (search)
sword thrust deep. 'Twas civil strife alone That dealt the wound and left the death behind.Mr. Froude in his essay entitled 'Divus Caesar' hints that these famous lines may have been written in mockery. Probably the five years known as the Golden Era of Nero had passed when they were written: yet the text itself does not aid such a suggestion; and the view generally taken, namely that Lucan was in earnest, appears preferable. There were many who dreamed at the time that the disasters of the Civil War were being compensated by the wealth and prosperity of the empire under Nero; and the assurance of universal peace, then almost realised, which is expressed in lines 69-71, seems inconsistent with the idea that this passage was written in irony. Lecky ('European Morals from Augustus to Charlemagne,' vol. i. p. 240) describes these latter verses as written 'with all the fervour of a Christian poet.' See also Merivale's ' Roman Empire,'chapter liv. Yet if the fates could find no other way