Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bedford County (Virginia, United States) or search for Bedford County (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
reach which place we had, because of the overflow, to go by rail to Madison, and thence by steamer down the St. Francis and up the Mississippi. The trip would have been a very tedious one; but the courtesy of Captain W. A. Joplin, (an old Bedford, Virginia, Confederate,) and his polite officers of the steamer Rene Macready, made our time pass very pleasantly, and the sight of the Mississippi, forty miles wide at that point, was very interesting to us, though not so to the poor sufferers by thrlottesville, 80 miles distant, in four days. During the night of the 16th June, and the day of the 17th, he hurried his troops, by railroad, to Lynchburg. On the evening of the, 17th the advance of his infantry was thrown into the works on the Bedford road to support the troops who were delaying Hunter's advance. By the next day (18th) most of Early's infantry were at Lynchburg, and when Hunter attacked he was repulsed. The Federal army, of 18,000 men, was much superior to Early in numbers,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ed the day, and at night General Lee had a fine audience and a splendid reception. We saw enough of Little Rock to be charmed with the city, and to resolve to go there again at our very first opportunity. But at 12 we were off for Memphis, to reach which place we had, because of the overflow, to go by rail to Madison, and thence by steamer down the St. Francis and up the Mississippi. The trip would have been a very tedious one; but the courtesy of Captain W. A. Joplin, (an old Bedford, Virginia, Confederate,) and his polite officers of the steamer Rene Macready, made our time pass very pleasantly, and the sight of the Mississippi, forty miles wide at that point, was very interesting to us, though not so to the poor sufferers by the flood. Arriving at Memphis we were met at the boat by the committee, who were introduced by our friend, Colonel H. D. Capers, and were at once taken possession of so cordially that the salute fired in honor of General Lee's arrival was entirely
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
ps to Lynchburg to hold it as long as he might against Hunter. It was the 13th June that Early left General Lee's lines at Richmond, and on this day Hunter threw forward his advance from Lexington to Buchanan. Early made a rapid march, reaching Charlottesville, 80 miles distant, in four days. During the night of the 16th June, and the day of the 17th, he hurried his troops, by railroad, to Lynchburg. On the evening of the, 17th the advance of his infantry was thrown into the works on the Bedford road to support the troops who were delaying Hunter's advance. By the next day (18th) most of Early's infantry were at Lynchburg, and when Hunter attacked he was repulsed. The Federal army, of 18,000 men, was much superior to Early in numbers, but Hunter was far from his base and (he says) his supply of ammunition was limited, This, with the repulse on the 18th, caused him to retreat during the night. Early followed next day, overhauling the rear-guard under Averell and driving it throug