Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Berkeley County (West Virginia, United States) or search for Berkeley County (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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appear to have been well armed in this fight. Those taken carried Minie muskets, of Harper's Ferry pattern. Altogether considered, this fight was marked by great cowardice on the part of the Rebels, and an easy victory upon the Federals'. They will now proceed to Winchester, by the fields over which old John Brown looked admiringly on his way to the gallows, and said: How beautiful are the grain fields! --Philadelphia Press, July 5. Another Union account. Falling Waters, Berkeley Co., Va., July 2d, 1861. it is now four o'clock P. M., and the battle of Falling Waters is over. Three men have been killed on our side. Geo. Drake of Company A, Wisconsin 1st Regiment, was shot through the head and expired instantly. One man was killed in the 11th Pennsylvania Regiment, and one in Colonel Thomas's 2d Cavalry. Corporal McGinley, of McMullin's Rangers, was shot through the foot. Wm. H. Kuhns of the 11th Pennsylvania Regiment, slightly touched from a cannon ball alongsid
Doc. 92.-movement on Bunker hill. Bunker hill, Berkeley Co., Va., July 16, 1861. Gen. Patterson moved, with his whole column, except two regiments, early yesterday morning to this place, where it is now encamped, ten miles from Martinsburg and twelve from Winchester. The army marched in two columns, one composed of the First Division, Major-General Cadwalader, and the Second Division, Major-General Kiem commanding; and the other of the Seventh and Eighth Brigades, Cols. Stone and Butterfield forming a Third Division, Major-General Sandford commanding. The First and Second Divisions came by the turnpike, and the Third by the old dirt road — both roads converging at this point. The troops and wagons of the Third Division formed a column over five miles long, and the other column was seven or eight miles long, the van reaching here before the rear guard had got far out of Martinsburg. The army marched in different order from that of the column coming from Williamsport to M
d this whole column, it is expected, will soon be moved there. --N. Y. Time, July 26. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Press makes the following statement:-- Hagerstown, Md., July 25, 1861. sir:--You will confer a favor upon the friends of justice by giving space to the accompanying statement. I make this request in behalf of Pennsylvania, whose commanding General has been accused of dereliction of duty. The following is based upon the information of citizens of Berkeley county, Virginia, well known to me, who, having been impressed in the rebel force, deserted therefrom: At the time the first advance into Virginia was ordered General Johnston's force numbered over 14,000 men, and had attached to it a park of splendid artillery. General Patterson's command did not exceed 11,000 men, and he had not over eight pieces of artillery, which latter were taken from him, compelling the return of our army to Maryland. The second advance was made by 9,000 men, and not ov