Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) or search for Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
Ontario, Canada, and who refused the order of knighthood offered by Queen Victoria; (3) Eugene, the subject of the present sketch; (4) Mathilde, who married Judge Henry D. Ogden; (5) Eliza, who married John R. Conway, and (6) Camille, who died in youth. Eugene Waggaman was educated at Mount St. Mary's College, Maryland, and graduated from there as valedictorian of the class of 1846. Returning to this State from school, he took charge of his mother's and his own sugar plantation in Jefferson Parish, and at the age of twenty-five years married Miss Felicie Sauve, the daughter of Pierre Sauve, of the same parish. During the years 1858-59 he was a member of the State Legislature which called the Constitutional Convention. In the next year the war had come. With the martial blood of his ancestors tingling in his veins, he at once prepared for the fight. He raised in his own parish a company of cavalry known as the Jefferson Chasseurs. These were the young men of the plantations,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
of this company at Malvern Hill. Magruder thus refers to him: The noble, accomplished, and gallant Harrison, commander of the Charles City Troop, uniting his own exertions with mine, rallied regiment after regiment, and leading one of them to the front, fell, pierced with seven wounds, near the enemy's batteries. This worthy member of one of Virginia's historic families, was a close kinsman of the Benjamin Harrison of 1774, who, when the storms of revolution were gathering, stood at Jefferson's right hand, as Partrick Henry stood at his left, to make the voice of Virginia heard in behalf of self-government. He was a resident of that section of Virginia from whose soil sprang three men who became Presidents of the United States. He possessed in the highest degree all those heroic and lovable traits of character that endeared him to his men. One of them, closer to him than many, had the day before, while resting at Timberlake's Store, tried to dissuade him from rash exposure of