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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Irish sympathy with the abolition movement. (search)
ndly effort the hands of the people. No pulses beat truer to liberty and humanity than those which in Dublin quicken at every good word from. abolition on this side the ocean; there can be no warmer words of welcome than those which greet the American Abolitionists on their thresholds. Let not any persuade us, Mr. Chairman, that the question of slavery is no business of ours, but belongs entirely to the South. Northern opinion, the weight of Northern power, is the real slave-holder of America. Their presence in the Union is the Carolinians' charter of safety,--the dread of the Northern bayonet is their real police. Without it the whole South were but the deck of a larger Creole, The brig Creole, of Richmond, Va., left Norfolk for New Orleans, October 30, 1841, with a cargo of tobacco and 135 slaves on board. November 7, the slaves took possession of the boat, killed the second mate in the struggle, and wounded some others who resisted, but otherwise inflicted no personal
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The pulpit (1860). (search)
sted in the great machinery that is to create the future,--I affirm that the pulpit of this country, tenanted though it is by some of the best educated and some of the ablest men in the country, does not hold the helm of the intellectual life of America. It does not guide the thought, as it did in the early ages of New England. It has a momentous influence, but it is only through dread and awe. It has made the masses afraid to think. It has told them that thought is infidelity, that intellecpular heart, and the men sitting still and calm in the Academy, agree. The upper and the nether mill-stone have said, Let it come to pass! and we shall grind up conservatism between us. The craving of the popular mind for truth, the opening in America for a wider intellectual and moral battle, taking into its bosom the seed which the Master who bestows thought is ready to plant,--between us two, we shall make in this very community in which we live, long before the middle-aged of us are in o