Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Larkinsville (Alabama, United States) or search for Larkinsville (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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, and there was no alternative but to turn up Elk River by way of Gilbertsboro, Elkton, etc., to the stone bridge at Fayetteville. There we crossed Elk, and proceeded to Winchester and Decherd. At Fayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport with the Fifteenth army corps, and leave General Dodge's command at Pulaski and along the railroad from Columbia to Decatur. I instructed General Blair to follow with the Second and First divisions by way of New-Market, Larkinsville, and Bellefonte, while I conducted the other two divisions by Decherd, the Fourth division crossing the mountains to Stevenson, and the Third by University Place and Sweiden's Cave. In person I proceeded by Sweiden's Lane and Battle Creek, reaching Bridgeport at night of November thirteenth. I immediately telegraphed to the Commanding-General my arrival and the position of my several divisions, and was summoned to Chattanooga. I took the first boat during the night of the fourtee
army. One Alabamian, McCurdy, during the expedition, made up a company, enrolled their names on a piece of brown paper with a pencil, borrowed arms, and actually went out with his men and captured a company of bushwhackers, called home-guards, and brought them into our camp. Information was obtained of a regiment, stationed in that part of the country, which has determined to a man to march into our lines at the first good opportunity. Deserters come in daily, both at Huntsville and Larkinsville. The result of all their reports is that, although the rebel army is being largely reenforced by conscription, desertions are quite equal to the increase. Soon after the battle of Mission Ridge, an order was issued offering to every enlisted man who produced a recruit a furlough of forty days. That order has been revoked, for the reason that the furloughed men seldom returned, and the recruits frequently deserted. Among the recent desertions is that of O. Montcalm, formerly of Louisvil